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Press release

Canadiens Send Michael Bournival to Hamilton; Sahir Gill Released

From @CanadiensMTL: Michel Therrien confirmed that Bournival should be back on Monday. He’ll play both Bulldogs’ games during the week-end.

CANADIENS ASSIGN BOURNIVAL TO BULLDOGS; Forward Sahir Gill also released from PTO by Bulldogs

Hamilton Bulldogs Media Release

749286-michael-bournival
Michael Bournival (Photo by LaPresse)

MONTREAL, QUE. – Montreal Canadiens and Hamilton Bulldogs general manager Marc Bergevin announced today the Canadiens have assigned forward Michael Bournival to the Bulldogs.

Bournival has not played in any regular season games yet this season. The 22-year-old split the 2013-14 season between the Canadiens and Bulldogs. In 60 regular season games with Montreal, the 5-11, 196-pound forward recorded 14 points (seven goals, seven assists) and 18 penalty minutes. In three regular season games with Hamilton, the Shawinigan, Que. native recorded three points (two goals, one assist) and two penalty minutes. In 72 career American Hockey League regular season games with the ‘Dogs, he has recorded 33 points (12 goals, 21 assists) and 28 penalty minutes.

The Bulldogs have also released forward Sahir Gill from his professional try out contract. Gill played in three pre-season games with the ‘Dogs. The Terrace, B.C. native spent the 2013-14 season – his first as a professional – with the ECHL’s Wheeling Nailers. In 67 regular season games with Wheeling, the 22-year-old recorded 54 points (13 goals, 41 assists) and 26 penalty minutes.

The puck drops for Hamilton’s home-opening weekend on Friday, Oct. 17, when the ‘Dogs host the Toronto Marlies at FirstOntario Centre at 7:30 p.m.

Hamilton Bulldogs 2014-15 season tickets, flex tickets, group tickets and single-game tickets are on sale now. For more information, call 1-866-DOGS-TIX or visit hamiltonbulldogs.com.

Listen to all Bulldogs regular season and post-season games live on Hamilton’s AM 900 CHML, on www.900chml.com or watch live on www.ahllive.com. Catch every Friday night home game live in high definition on Cable 14.

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IceCaps game report

Bournival, Pateryn Lead Bulldogs Past Admirals [with AUDIO]

By Dan Kramer, Senior Writer, All Habs Hockey Magazine

POST-GAME AUDIO:  Michael BournivalSylvain Lefebvre

HAMILTON, ON – It seems the margin between the Hamilton Bulldogs being a competitive team this season and being one that struggles to stay out of last place in the Western Conference was a slim 18. That 18 is the number sophomore forward Michael Bournival wears in the AHL, as Friday night his pair of goals helped the team to a 4-2 victory over the Milwaukee Admirals, improving to 2-0-0 during the winger’s three-game conditioning stint. His return, coupled with solid goaltending from Dustin Tokarski has people in Hamilton believing that a late-season surge to at least make the playoff race interesting is indeed still possible despite the precarious situation in which the club finds itself.

The Bulldogs are no strangers to strong opening periods, but their efforts wouldn’t go unrewarded Friday night. After an 0-for-2 cold streak, Hamilton’s powerplay came to life with Patrick Cehlin in the box just past the five minute mark. Marek Mazanek was scrambling in the crease as a puck came back to Nathan Beaulieu at the point. His heavy slapper went well wide, but ricocheted off the end boards and right back out to Michael Bournival, who quickly batted it into the deserted cage for a 1-0 advantage.

Greg Pateryn's goal and assist helped the 'Dogs win their second straight. (PHOTO: Brandon Taylor, Hamilton Bulldogs)
Greg Pateryn’s goal and assist helped the ‘Dogs win their second straight. (PHOTO: Brandon Taylor, Hamilton Bulldogs)

Another powerplay – the third of four Hamilton would be gifted in the opening stanza – allowed the home team to extend their lead. Greg Pateryn accepted a Martin St. Pierre feed along the blueline, and the d-man took two steps in before firing a wrist shot top shelf past Mazanek, earning his 11th marker on the season. The goal tied Pateryn for fourth in the AHL in that category among all d-men.

Just as common as strong openings has been second period collapses in Hamilton this season, but the Bulldogs were determined not to let up this time around. It was again Bournival in the centre of the action, taking a pass as he charged to the net, and being awarded a penalty shot on a slash despite still managing to get a shot off. With a second opportunity, the former Shawinigan Cataractes captain made no mistake, letting go a quick wrister that deflected off the far post and in.

Milwaukee would try to make a game of it, catching the pair of Morgan Ellis and Drew Schiestel flat-footed in their own end as Mathieu Tousignant found Michael Liambas uncovered on in the slot for a one-timer that beat Tokarski, reducing the lead to two.

Whereas on many nights the first goal against results in a dip in the intensity and level of play of the Bulldogs, Friday they stormed right back to the attack. With Nick Tarnasky creating havoc in front of the goal, a Greg Pateryn point shot deflected off the pugilist’s active stick just as an Admiral defender collided with Mazanek, resulting in the puck trickling through the helpless netminder. A four-goal outburst is a rare occurrence for the team’s anemic offense, evident in the 12-1-0 record they’ve posted when accomplishing such a feat.

After a couple of ineffective third period powerplays for Hamilton, the Admirals found one final breath of life. An odd scrum after an uncalled Mike Blunden board resulted in Hamilton being called for not one but two minor infractions. With both Nathan Beaulieu and Maxime Macenauer in the box, Milwaukee quickly capitalized on the 5-on-3 opportunity as Taylor Beck‘s big point shot beat Tokarski bar-down.

Despite sustained pressure from Milwaukee for the remainder of the powerplay, the ‘Dogs defense – backed by a solid performance from Tokarski – was up to the task, shutting things down the rest of the way in preserving the 4-2 victory.

Coach Sylvain Lefebvre was understandably in a cheerful mood following the win, praising the night’s first star. “I just talked to Montreal, and we’re gonna keep [Bournival],” he joked, before quickly confirming that it was in fact just a three-game conditioning stint. “He never stops working, and he’s a good guy to have around. Everybody loves him. He’s a quiet guy, and just goes about his business.”

While not entirely happy with Sven Andrighetto‘s performance, coach Lefebvre also confirmed he will continue the experiment of skating the Swiss forward at centre. “Wednesday’s game was a better game for him. Tonight he didn’t have the same spark, but he made some good plays with Bournival and Thomas. I’m gonna keep him at centre for now. I think he enjoys playing there and he gets chances.”

Bournival himself was fairly critical of his own play despite his two goals. “I think I need to improve some things in my game, especially defensively. There are some things in my game I need to work on, and I’m gonna try to do that tomorrow. I need to be a little sharper.”

The final game of Bournival’s return to the ‘Dogs will be Saturday night at home against the Abbotsford Heat. It’s the last contest in Hamilton prior to a nine-game road trip that will ultimately decide the team’s end-of-season fate.

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Feature

Down on the Farm – Bulldogs Get Help from the Big Club

By Dan Kramer, Senior Writer, All Habs Hockey Magazine

HAMILTON, ON – A team with every reason not to show up on a Wednesday night got some help from two players who strongly believe they have plenty to play for, as the Hamilton Bulldogs – despite any hope of a playoff berth virtually nil at this point – downed the playoff-bound Abbotsford Heat 3-1 at First Ontario Centre.

The win was just Hamilton’s second in their past seven games, leaving them ten points out of the 8th and final playoff spot in the AHL’s Western Conference with only fourteen games remaining. The situation would have been even more grim if not for a couple of familiar faces that made returns to the line-up.

Bournival had 1 assist playing on left wing with Andrighetto & Thomas in his first game with the Bulldogs (PHOTO: Dario Ayala, Montreal Gazette)
Bournival had 1 assist playing on left wing with Andrighetto & Thomas in his first game with the Bulldogs (PHOTO: Dario Ayala)

First was Dustin Tokarski, unquestionably the MVP of a Bulldog team that has struggled to score all season, relying on stellar goaltending to win games. Fresh off a shutout of the Buffalo Sabres Sunday, Tokarski wasn’t forced to turn in his best effort of the season against the Abbotsford Heat, but managed 27 saves that allowed his side to overcome an early 1-0 deficit. As Devan Dubnyk‘s difficult season has continued in the AHL, having Tokarski back between the pipes should bring an extra dose of confidence to his team’s play, just as Carey Price‘s return seems to have done for the Canadiens.

Next was Michael Bournival, returning to game action on a conditioning stint in Hamilton after missing considerable time with a concussion. Bournival was a surprise in making the Montreal roster out of training camp in his second professional season, but hadn’t looked at all out of place in the NHL after hardly lighting the American League on fire last year. He showed in hist first AHL game of the season just how far his game had progressed, slotting right on to the top line with Christian Thomas and Sven Andrighetto, and energizing it to be the game’s best all night. Bournival would register an assist on Thomas’s game-winning goal, accepting a pass from Andrighetto and firing a shot on Aaron Dell before Thomas would bang home the rebound.

If Dell’s name sounds familiar to you, it’s because he attended numerous Canadiens’ off-season Development Camps back in the day. Many assumed the organization would sign Dell out of the University of North Dakota given their extended look at him and the thin pipeline in goal at the time, but such a move never came to fruition, and Dell has struggled to establish himself as more than a top ECHL starter to date.

But back to Bournival, a peculiar Sylvain Lefebvre decision was to play the natural center on left wing on the top line. Andrighetto, having played wing all season, was shifted to centre for the first time. While it may be as simple as limiting Bournival’s responsibilities for his first game back in over a month, it’s also interesting to consider the Canadiens may have taken the same approach as they did with Louis Leblanc. That is to say having made the determination that a player doesn’t project to the next level as a centre, and thus permanently switching him to the wing.

Integrating Bournival into the line-up required Lefebvre to make a decision on who to sit. Rather than cut one of his fourth line energy players, the head coach decided to use the opportunity to send a statement to a guy supposed to be one of his offensive leaders but whose game has been in sharp decline as a sophomore. Just as he tried to do in sitting Martin St. Pierre two weeks ago, Lefebvre hopes a one-game benching of Patrick Holland will get the versatile, two-way forward going for the final stretch. The situation is a pretty significant reversal from this time a year ago, where Holland was far more valuable to the ‘Dogs as a first line winger than Bournival as a third line pivot.

At 22, Holland is hardly a lost cause, but if he want another sniff at the NHL beyond the five games played there this year, he’ll need to show in the final year of his entry level contract that the present season was merely a blip on the radar of his development.

Two other notable players were out of the line-up Wednesday, but not by the coach’s own will. An injury plagued pro rookie season for Darren Dietz has come to an end, the team announced, with the defenseman not expected to return until 2014-15. A less serious lower body injury forced Greg Pateryn to miss the game. The d-man is considered day-t0-day, with his absence necessitating huge minutes from a top pairing of Nathan Beaulieu and Davis Drewiske.

Drewiske has played strong two-way hockey since joining the Bulldogs, and will be an important piece if the team manages to win enough games to keep things interesting over the final fourteen contests. Once the season is done, he will undoubtedly serve as one of the “black aces” in Montreal, and will be available to challenge for an NHL roster spot in the Fall, given the year remaining on the contract he signed last summer.

Also interesting to watch we’ll be how Hamilton handles its three-headed monster in goal. Despite Tokarski’s far superior play, the staff never hesitated to sit him for Robert Mayer after a tough loss, and now with both Dubnyk and Mayer in the mix, despite all he’s shown, Tokarski’s leash may be even shorter.

The ‘Dogs have two home games this weekend before heading out on a nine-game road trip. Friday’s game against Milwaukee and Saturday’s rematch with Abbotsford are must-wins, or the team will see the plug pulled on the life support on which its season rests. This also means it may be the last chance for hometown fans to see their team in meaningful action this season, so grab your tickets now from http://www.hamiltonbulldogs.com/.

 

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Feature

Starting from the Bottom – Bulldogs Set to Open Camp

By Dan Kramer, Senior Writer, All Habs Hockey Magazine

TORONTO, ON – There were few spots up for grabs in Montreal Canadiens training camp. The team had finished 2nd in the NHL’s Eastern Conference last season, and despite a disappointing first round playoff loss to the Ottawa Senators, the return to health of some key veterans and development of young players have many hopeful that the building blocks are in place for long-term success. With many players returning on one-way NHL contracts, camp held little suspense, and what little there was mostly vanished when Michel Therrien revealed his plans to stick to last season’s line combinations.

Stability is a foreign concept in the American Hockey League. Teams that perform well are generally led by top players, whose outstanding performances see them given shots in the National Hockey League the following season. Few players sign long-term deals to stay in the AHL, and thus seeing players swap teams annually is hardly an unusual sight. Drafted North American prospects come of age for league eligibility, and thus teams are stocked with new young hopefuls.

In Hamilton, coming off a season where the hometown squad finished dead last in the league, the multitude of new faces who will report for physicals Friday will be a welcome reprieve from the memories of a year gone wrong. Thursday, the group that will attempt to start from the bottom and work their way back towards respectability, was announced as the Bulldogs revealed their opening training camp roster.

Joonas Nattinen is finally healthy again but will have to battle for ice time in a contract season.
Joonas Nattinen is finally healthy again but will have to battle for ice time in a contract season.

On it are most of the names you’d expect. Louis Leblanc and Joonas Nattinen return at forward, while Morgan Ellis hopes to take on a larger role on defense. Robert Mayer will again battle for playing time between the pipes. Not listed but undoubtedly soon to join the group once cut from the Canadiens are Martin St. PierrePatrick HollandChristian ThomasMagnus NygrenNathan BeaulieuDarren Dietz, and Dustin Tokarski. Provided there are no further injuries, no more than one of Michael BournivalMichael Blunden, or Gabriel Dumont should stick with the Habs at this point either, though the latter two would be subject to waivers if they are to join the ‘Dogs. Injuries on defense may delay the return of a Greg Pateryn or Jarred Tinordi, but at least the former should eventually spend some time in the Hammer this season.

Then you add in the rest of the fresh wave of prospects with Sven Andrighetto, Stefan Fournier, and Erik Nystrom, and this summer’s depth signings in Stefan Chaput, Ben DuffyJustin CourtnallStephen MacAulayMatt Grassi, and Drew Schiestel, and you start to get a crowded picture.

One imagines a preconceived depth chart might look something like the following:

Patrick Holland – Martin St. Pierre – Christian Thomas
Mike Blunden – Michael Bournival – Louis Leblanc
Erik Nystrom – Nick Tarnasky – Sven Andrighetto
Stefan Fournier – Joonas Nattinen – Steve Quailer
Ben Duffy, Justin Courtnall, Stephen MacAulay, Stefan Chaput

Greg Pateryn – Nathan Beaulieu
Magnus Nygren – Darren Dietz
Morgan Ellis – Drew Schiestel
Matt Grassi, Joel Chouinard

Dustin Tokarski
Robert Mayer
Mike Condon, Peter Delmas

With so many names already penciled in, where does the suspense come into play? Well the names above aren’t the only ones on Hamilton’s camp roster. The Bulldogs have invited a number of others – ranging from high profile veterans and former prospects to the rather obscure – to attend camp on tryouts in the hopes of earning a job with the team.

Would an organization so bent on character give a chance to a player with the reputation of Aliu?
Would an organization so bent on character give a chance to a player with the reputation of Aliu?

The first name that stands out is Akim Aliu. The 6’4″ Nigerian winger was a 2nd round pick of the Chicago Blackhawks in 2007, but the offense to his game never developed as the ‘Hawks had hoped. He has been labelled a head case with a bad attitude throughout his career, but has been able to reinvent his style of play, sliding into a tough guy / enforcer role that saw him appear in seven total games for the Calgary Flames split over the past two seasons. There tend to be far more fights in the AHL than the NHL, and thus most squads carry multiple enforcer-types, something the current Hamilton roster is light on. Thus, Aliu’s size and strengths could appeal to the team’s management enough to earn him a spot if he can show improved off-ice demeanour.

A more familiar name on the list is that of Alex Belzile. The 22-year old’s first pro season was spent largely with the ECHL’s Gwinnett Gladiators, but he impressed on a late-season tryout with the Bulldogs, scoring 8 points in 14 games while driving the net with regularity despite his very average 5’11” frame. Belzile frequently dressed on Hamilton’s top scoring line, though with the new bodies on the roster it’s tough to see exactly where he could carve himself a niche for the coming season. Still, he has already shown he can cut it, and so he should be considered one of the favoured tryouts to further stack Montreal’s AHL affiliate with forward depth.

A couple of other QMJHL-bred forwards also received invites. David Laliberte, a 2004 Philadelphia Flyers fourth round pick with 11 games of NHL experience, and Maxime Macenauer, a Anaheim 2007 third rounder who played 29 games for the Ducks in 2011-12, seem like they could bring every bit as much to the table as a Stefan Chaput or Justin Courtnall, but decisions will ultimately have to be made. While Hamilton certainly endeavours to put up better results than last year, they remain primarily a development team and need to leave room for prospects to get some ice time amidst the more experienced veterans.

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Wiseman’s out to prove he has something left in the tank, and could be a pleasant surprise.

The rest up front: Andre Bouvet-Morrissette is a 6’3″ 22-year old winger coming off his rookie pro season that was split between two AHL and two ECHL clubs… Kelsey Wilson is a 27-year old 6’1″ forward who has bounced around leagues with time in the AHL, ECHL, Austria, and the U.K… Jordan Owens is a veteran of 300 AHL games with a mediocre stat line who is coming off a year in Denmark… Chad Wiseman is a 32-year old Burlington, Ontario native who played nine NHL games between 2002 and 2006 and was once a top AHL scorer, but has been slowed by injuries (he could fill the homegrown scorer void left by Joey Tenute)… Trevor Bruess is an ECHL veteran who gets limited AHL action annually as a temporary injury replacement.

Dalton Thrower will be a name to watch on defense at this camp. Not turning 20 until December 20th, Thrower would be one of the league’s youngest players if he makes the team. But it’s no coincidence the Canadiens have yet to sign their 2012 second rounder to an entry level contract, as Thrower is also eligible to join the WHL’s Vancouver Giants for the coming campaign. If the Canadiens blueline is fairly healthy and thus Hamilton gets both Beaulieu and Pateryn back immediately, it’s likely Thrower will be sent down for a final junior season rather than sitting in the Copps Coliseum press box or heading to the ECHL. That is, unless he forced management’s hand with a standout effort in camp to begin reversing the effects of a disappointing 2012-13 season.

With Tinordi playing like he wants to stay in Montreal, the Bulldogs may be in the market for an experienced blueliner to round out their group. The inside track has to go to Matt Lashoff due to his appearance at Montreal’s camp, but he underwhelmed there, opening a door for the other invitees.

Given the aforementioned absence of toughness in the roster, Nathan McIver might be Lashoff’s biggest competition to earn a deal on D. McIver was a Vancouver Canucks eighth round pick in 2003, and collected 287 penalty minutes in 62 AHL games last season. He also appeared in 36 NHL games between 2006 and 2009, registering one assist and 95 PIMs.

A final notable is another one-time Canuck pick, 2009 fourth round selection Jeremy Price (no relation to Carey Price). The 22-year old two-way d-man completed his stint with Colgate University and then got a five-game tryout with the Chicago Wolves at the tail end of last season, but didn’t show enough to earn a full-time deal. With the prospect of Tinordi, Pateryn, and Beaulieu graduating to the NHL within the next year, the Bulldogs may look at someone like Price to provide extra insurance in case of injuries, trades, and call-ups.

The rest on D: Pierre Durepos is a 21-year old blueliner and former teammate of Nathan Beaulieu‘s, having spent the past four seasons with the Saint John Sea Dogs… Paul Cianfrini is a journeyman whose career took from the OHL to Nipissing University and then to the ECHL for the past two seasons… Jonathan Narbonne is a 21-year old d-man who won a Memorial Cup with Michael Bournival and Morgan Ellis in Shawinigan in 2012.

The first on-ice sessions of camp will be this Saturday, and most practices and scrimmages are open to the public. If you’ll be in the Greater Hamilton Area, stop by and check out some potential future Canadiens. The full schedule can be found here:
http://www.allhabs.net/blog/2013/09/18/official-release-bulldogs-2013-training-camp-begins-friday/

 

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Feature

End of Season Hamilton Bulldogs Report Card – Part 1

By Dan Kramer, Senior Writer, All Habs Hockey Magazine

HAMILTON, ON – There was a lot of hope and promise surrounding the Hamilton Bulldogs entering the 2012-13 season. Despite the team’s struggles last season, an incoming class filled with some of the Montreal Canadiens’ top prospects, combined with the return of a proven top AHL netminder, meant the team had realistic aspirations of a return to the post-season.

Unfortunately, things didn’t go according to plan. The reasons the team was mired in the Western Conference basement throughout most of the season are plentiful. You can blame the combination of too many rookies on the ice and behind the bench. Early injuries to key veterans. Disappointing performances by players from whom more was expected. Not getting the calibre of goaltending it takes to win. Or a sheer lack of scoring punch.

Not everything was negative, however. A number of rookies impressed in their debuts at the professional level, and we saw the graduation of at least one impact player to the Habs. I’ve been fortunate to have the opportunity to be around the Bulldogs throughout the season in Hamilton, and with the peril-filled campaign now in the books, here’s a look at a breakdown of their performances player-by-player.

reportcard

[part 1 of this report will assess only those who played at least 20 games for the Bulldogs this season; part 2 will look at those who played fewer]

 

FORWARDS: 

MIKE BLUNDEN – A

AHL Numbers: 54 GP, 10-12-22, +2, 76 PIM
The Skinny
: 26 years old, 6’4″, 218 lbs. 39 NHL GP in 2011-12. A favourite of Randy Cunneyworth. Grinder.
His Role: Blunden has shown he can produce at the American Hockey League level, so was most often inserted into Hamilton’s top 6.
His Performance: He was frequently one of the few players to actually show up during the team’s tougher stretches, doing it all on the ice. Produced scoring chances (even when they wouldn’t go in for him), played physically, killed penalties, was used on the powerplay. His numbers could have been a little better, but the effort was there night in and night out.
Future Outlook: He would be a good veteran to have back with the ‘Dogs, while being a serviceable call-up should Montreal’s fourth line need reinforcement.

MICHAEL BOURNIVAL – B+

AHL Numbers: 69 GP, 10-20-30, -3, 26 PIM
The Skinny: 20 years old, 6’0″, 187 lbs. Played for Canada at the WJC. Captained Shawinigan to a Memorial Cup in 2011-12. Just don’t remind him that his team first lost in the second round of the QMJHL playoffs.
His Role: Bournival played both center and wing on second and third lines as a pro rookie in Hamilton. He was used in every situation, earning considerable minutes on both the powerplay and penalty kill. A true two-way player, whose offensive game perked up in spurts but was unnoticeable on many nights as well.
His Performance: His 30 points were good for third on the offensively destitute Bulldog roster. Showed the development you hope for from a rookie, becoming more consistent as the season wore on, earning praise from his teammates and coach.
Future Outlook: May never project as more than a third liner, but positive signs he still has NHL upside. Requires more seasoning, likely to spend all of next season in Hamilton once again.

DARRYL BOYCE – C-

AHL Numbers: 22 GP, 1-6-7, -5, 27 PIM
The Skinny: 28 years old, 6’0″, 200 lbs. 84 career NHL GP, scoring 6 goals and 18 points. Allegedly.
His Role: A team full of rookies desperately needed some veteran leadership, and hoped to depend on Boyce – particularly once Palushaj and Geoffrion went down with injuries.
His Performance: Boyce was a disappointment from day one, providing little offense, taking poor penalties, and in no way carrying any sort of heavy load to take pressure off the young players.
Future Outlook: Was let go before the end of his 25-game tryout. Nothing to see here.

STEFAN CHAPUT – C+

AHL Numbers: 48 GP, 5-12-17, -12, 25 PIM
The Skinny: 25 years old, 6’0″, 185 lbs. Think of him as this year’s Phil DeSimone.
His Role: A skilled offensive forward that the team looked to for secondary scoring from a second or third line. He was on an AHL deal and worked his way back up from the ECHL’s Wheeling Nailers.
His Performance: On a team crying for any additional offense, Chaput produced at a similar clip to his prior pro seasons. He would show flashes on some nights, and like so many of his teammates, be wildly inconsistent on others. But you couldn’t blame him for a lack of effort. Had his season ended early on the receiving end of a big open ice check.
Future Outlook: A dime-a-dozen type, unlikely to be back. Enough continuity in the roster, need to bring in some fresh blood.

GABRIEL DUMONT – A+

AHL Numbers: 55 GP, 16-15-31, -2, 83 PIM
The Skinny: 22 years old, 5’10”, 186 lbs. A career third/fourth line grinder who just happened to lead the team in scoring.
His Role: Everything. There were many glaring weaknesses at forward on this squad, and Dumont did his best to shore them all up. His physical game kept opponents honest in protecting his very young teammates, and he suddenly started burying pucks on a team starving for any scoring.
His Performance: Had he not missed 21 games with his time spent in Montreal, would have been the easy choice for team MVP. Fearlessly charged the net, fired pucks on goal whenever possible, and played big minutes in every situation. Was this season just an anomaly? Perhaps. As he himself said, the last time he led a team in scoring was probably in Midget or Peewee.
Future Outlook: The fourth line is crowded in Montreal, and there is even less room for more undersized forwards. But Dumont’s game is pure effort, and he is likely to stick with the Habs in at least a 13th forward role in the Fall.

OLIVIER FORTIER – C-

AHL Numbers: 32 GP, 1-1-2, -1, 15 PIM
The Skinny: 23 years old, 6’0″, 185 lbs. Too good for the ECHL. So basically, David Desharnais. Less skilled, but bigger and better defensively. They must be on similar contracts.
His Role: Fortier was Montreal’s third round pick in 2007. The Canadiens opted to let him walk this summer, but then brought him back on an AHL deal for the Bulldogs. He is a two-way forward, but put up strong ECHL numbers, earning him a recall.
His Performance: Fortier’s development was derailed seasons ago by repeated injuries. He got off to a shaky start in training camp, not in peak form, evident in subpar skating. He was a body to fill a spot. A lunchpale blue collar hard worker.
Future Outlook: Not the season Fortier needed to get back in the organization’s good graces. Unlikely to return.

BRENDAN GALLAGHER – A+

AHL Numbers: 36 GP, 10-10-20, +0, 61 PIM
The Skinny: 28 years old, 6’3″, 220 lbs. Actually that’s just how he plays. But you know who this guy is.
His Role: Ideally you don’t depend on a rookie to lead the way up front for your team, but Gallagher quickly assumed the role of offensive catalyst.  And did so with a smile on his face. Never met a shot opportunity he didn’t like or opposing crease in which he didn’t feel at home.
His Performance: His play was far better than his numbers indicated, with a lack of quality linemates and some poor puck luck despite may many shots and chances to blame. A remarkable rookie season that saw him play the exact same way he had in the WHL when making the jump to the AHL, and then ultimately taking that style straight to the NHL post-lockout.
Future Outlook: Gallagher looks to be an impact player in Montreal for years to come. A high-energy second line winger.

KYLE HAGEL – C+

AHL Numbers: 67 GP, 2-4-6, -13, 172 PIM
The Skinny: 28 years old, 6’0″, 205 lbs. The most kind-hearted scrapper since Georges Laraque.
His Role: Hamilton local. Willing combatant. Great teammate and community guy.
His Performance: Seemed like an important cog on the team. Somehow always in the right place at the right time, as opportune scoring chances always ended up on his stick. Unfortunately, you’d rather it have been pretty much anyone else on the team’s stick.
Future Outlook: As a fourth liner or 13th forward, seems like a guy the Bulldogs would want back. A leader off-ice. Every AHL team needs players willing to drop the gloves.

PATRICK HOLLAND – A-

AHL Numbers: 69 GP, 10-18-28, -12, 8 PIM
The Skinny: 21 years old, 6’0″, 175 lbs. Undoubtedly the best former 7th round selection Montreal has ever traded for in the middle of a game.
His Role: To prove that he had game and that his WHL numbers weren’t just a product of playing with two skilled overage forwards. Cemented himself a first line job by mid-season.
His Performance: Holland started hot, went cold for a bit, and then finished out the season as likely the team’s top offensive threat. He was moved to center temporarily then returned to a more comfortable role on the wing. Gained confidence as the season went on, challenging opposing defenders with quick dekes with increasing frequency and often successfully creating quality chances.  Great offensive instincts and played the point on the powerplay for most of the year. Season ended a few games early after taking a heavy hit, but it’s said to not be anything too serious.
Future Outlook: Should be one of the leaders up front for the ‘Dogs next year and a primary call-up option for an offensive forward role.

LOUIS LEBLANC – C

AHL Numbers: 62 GP, 10-8-18, -18, 53 PIM
The Skinny: 22 years old, 6’0″, 190 lbs. If we pretend he was injured and didn’t play this season, you’ll remember him as one of Montreal’s top prospects.
His Role: Leblanc was expected to be a leader for the team up front as a second year pro on a team of rookies. He wasn’t given much of a chance to rekindle last season’s sparks with Geoffrion and Palushaj, and spent most of the year on a third line with limited powerplay time.
His Performance: That said, Leblanc didn’t earn much more than that. Giveaways. Lazy penalties. Little creativity offensively. Decent work shorthanded, but that’s about where the positives ended most nights. Had a good patch or two, though still a wasted/lost season for him on the whole. He was hindered early on by a high ankle sprain – a tough injury to return from – but you can only point to that as an excuse for so long. Have to assume it became more of a mental thing, with frustrations mounting when production didn’t come as easily as it had the year prior.
Future Outlook: It’s too early to give up on Leblanc at 22, especially after not looking out of place in the NHL last season. He’s got enough skill and instinct to bounce back and even make the Canadiens out of camp in the Fall, but he’ll need to put in a lot of work and training time over the summer.

PHILIPPE LEFEBVRE – D

AHL Numbers: 23 GP, 4-3-7, +6, 10 PIM
The Skinny: 22 years old, 5’11”, 186 lbs. Every aspect of his game is about as remarkable as his size.
His Role: Fill a roster spot. Play on a third line. Keep it simple. Don’t get your team in trouble.
His Performance: I had to check three or four times to confirm he finished the season a +6. Really?? On THIS team?! Ok, seriously. Soft, small two-way player with no real discernible skill set.
Future Outlook: He has a year left on his entry level deal, likely to be spent split between the ECHL and AHL.

JOONAS NATTINEN – C+

AHL Numbers: 24 GP, 5-4-9, +6, 8 PIM
The Skinny: 22 years old, 6’2″, 187 lbs. Skinny is a fitting descriptor here.
His Role: A third line center you could think of as a less productive Andreas Engqvist. That may not sound overly flattering, but Engqvist was a great AHL player before heading back to Europe, and Nattinen is still young with potential to reach at least that level.
His Performance: Nattinen was a streaky scorer this season and last, but plays a solid all-around game. Adept in his own end, and willing to take the body. His season was cut short by a shoulder injury, but to his credit, he remained with the team all year, always seen around the dressing room after each game.
Future Outlook: He has one year left on his deal, which will determine his future in the organization. Should be counted upon in a third line role for the Bulldogs.

AARON PALUSHAJ – B+

Bulldog Numbers: 21 GP, 7-3-10, -9, 18 PIM
The Skinny: 23 years old, 5’11”, 187 lbs. 38 GP, 1-4-5 with the Canadiens in 2011-12. A huge fan favourite and leading offensive powerhouse… In the American Hockey League.
His Role: Palushaj was expected to be one of this team’s top players, standing in the spotlight to provide shelter for the first year bunch just getting their feet wet.
His Performance: While the effort was there, his production lagged early on. The magic between he and Blake Geoffrion seen last season was gone. Until the two synched up again. In the sense that a dozen games after Geoffrion was injured, the same fate awaited Palushaj. Pretty amazing he shared honours for being named “Hardest Working Bulldog of the Game” most often at year’s end with two other players despite playing only 21 games.
Future Outlook: You know the story here. When he finally got healthy, the lockout had ended, and Montreal tried to slip him through waivers to return him to the Bulldogs. And he ended up in Colorado, where he has played roughly 3 of every 4 games. RFA this summer.

STEVE QUAILER – B-

AHL Numbers: 64 GP, 6-4-10, -7, 54 PIM
The Skinny: 23 years old, 6’4″, 200 lbs. Scored the goal that saved Christmas in Hamilton with a highlight reel solo effort on Teddy Bear Toss night.
His Role: A third line winger who spent a little too much time skating around trying to keep up with the play. Also to provide the Copps Coliseum press gallery with endless hours of entertainment as a certain Hamilton Spectator columnist enjoyed randomly shouting out “QUUAAILERR!” whenever he would see him on the ice.
His Performance: Occasionally he would have a decent game offensively and you’d come away thinking there was something there. A drool-worthy frame, which he would use on other nights to put opposing players into the boards. Showed enough of a varied set of abilities to be hopeful that there remains some potential in him, but a long-shot project for the NHL at this point, despite having just completed his pro rookie season. Yet another player whose season ended with an injury.
Future Outlook: He’ll be back with the Bulldogs next season. He’s in a similar spot to Joonas Nattinen. That would be two-thirds of a tall third line.

ZACK STORTINI – D-

AHL Numbers: 73 GP, 2-4-6, -14, 241 PIM
The Skinny: 27 years old, 6’4″, 215 lbs. 257 career NHL GP, 14-27-41. And if you saw him play this season, you’d swear that was a joke.
His Role: Stortini was a big fan favourite when he won the Calder Cup with the Bulldogs back in 2007, and memories of that season are the only reasonable explanation for many still being a fan of his this year. A fourth line grinder who – most nights – couldn’t reliably take a regular shift.
His Performance: His physical game came and went, picking up later on in the season. His fights were more of the staged variety than sticking up for teammates. A locker room veteran, sure, but mostly useless on the ice. He seemed a coach’s favourite early on, but his poor play could only go on so long until he was put on the fourth line and played under 10 minutes a night.
Future Outlook: Wouldn’t expect him back. There is enough team toughness that one dedicated enforcer is enough in the squad’s everyday line-up. The veteran that’s needed would score more than six points in 73 games.

JOEY TENUTE – A-

AHL Numbers: 40 GP, 8-17-25, -3, 51 PIM
The Skinny: 30 years old, 5’9″, 190 lbs. The best Bulldog most Hab fans have never heard of.
His Role: After toiling in European leagues since 2008, Tenute didn’t play hockey this Fall. When his hometown Hamilton Bulldogs came calling mid-season, it looked like he’d be a short-term injury replacement. He would finish the season as the club’s first line center.
His Performance: Tenute produces from the get-go for the Bulldogs, quickly earning the upgrade from tryout to AHL contract. A leader on and off the ice, Tenute has a good release, quick hands, and sharp offensive instincts. A veteran of a single NHL game back in 2005-06 with the Washington Capitals, he’s unlikely to ever get another shot on that stage, but did everything that could be asked of him, while always a good, long-winded post-game quote.
Future Outlook: I don’t think there’s anyone who wouldn’t like to see the hometown feel-good story back with the ‘Dogs next season, but the pending UFA would be much more natural on a second scoring line with a bigger or more skilled center to bare the top line workload.

 

DEFENSEMEN:

NATHAN BEAULIEU – A

AHL Numbers: 67 GP, 7-24-31, -8, 63 PIM
The Skinny: 20 years old, 6’3″, 191 lbs. Back-to-back QMJHL championships with Saint John’s under Montreal assistant coach Gerard Gallant – a man who empathizes with Beaulieu’s displeasure over having a French accent placed on his family name.
His Role: Around mid-December, something clicked. Beaulieu grew from a boy to a man, earning a top pairing role – most often with Greg Pateryn once he returned from injury – and holding it till season’s end. Top even strength minutes, number one powerplay minutes, and yes, even big penalty kill minutes.
His Performance: He was named the team’s top defenseman, rookie of the year, and most impressively, M.V.P. He matured on and off the ice. His 31 points tied for the team lead with Gabriel Dumont. And oh yeah, he started the year as one of the youngest players in the league! By season’s end, his confidence was at a point where he never hesitated to try to beat opposing players one-on-one or pull a quick spin-o-rama. He is skilled enough that it all worked more often than not, and when not, his tremendous skating ability often allowed him to correct his own mistakes.
Future Outlook: In a word, bright. Looks to be a certain future top 4 guy in the NHL, and his game will become even more complete as he fills out his frame. There will likely be one opening on the Montreal blueline in the Fall, and Beaulieu starts with an inside track towards locking it down.

ANTOINE CORBIN – C-

AHL Numbers: 30 GP, 1-2-3, -11, 22 PIM
The Skinny: 20 years old, 6’3″, 206 lbs. Played for Prince Albert, Hamilton, and San Francisco all in 2012-13. Three leagues, three very different cities.
His Role: Injuries necessitated the addition of depth players to the Hamilton blueline early in the season, and Corbin had impressed the most in training camp. A bottom pairing blueliner whose minutes were sheltered and who was often a healthy scratch.
His Performance: His size makes you wonder, but nothing to see here. Coaching staff seemed to lose trust in him early, preferring to bestow increased responsibilities on the other five blueliners many nights when he was in the line-up.
Future Outlook: He was a stopgap this season and shouldn’t be difficult to upgrade.

JASON DESANTIS – C

Bulldog Numbers: 27 GP, 2-3-5, -4, 18 PIM
The Skinny: 27 years old, 5’11”, 185 lbs. No relation to the director of the Montreal Impact.
His Role: DeSantis was a late-blooming breakout offensive rearguard for Saint John’s last season and brought in via trade to help a sputtering Hamilton powerplay.
His Performance: Disappointing offensive output and not the most dependable player in his own end. He had personal off-ice issues to deal with this season that took him away from the team for a spell, and may have been a partial cause for his regression on-ice.
Future Outlook: He’ll be a UFA this summer, and given his play, he’s likely to be one of those let go to allow a last place squad to reformulate its core.

MORGAN ELLIS – B-

AHL Numbers: 71 GP, 4-4-8, -16, 57 PIM
The Skinny: 20 years old, 6’2″, 196 lbs.
His Role: Many believed Ellis’s well-rounded game had him closer to the NHL than Nathan Beaulieu or Jarred Tinordi coming into the season. He was slower to adapt than the two first round picks, playing a #4 or bottom pairing role for the ‘Dogs, while taking shifts on the penalty kill.
His Performance: Pretty average. There were few nights where you noticed that Morgan Ellis was in the line-up, though for a defense-first blueliners, that isn’t always a bad thing. Had some trouble adapting to the pace of the game. Not much offense. Not particularly physical. Some raw skills with lots of room for improvement. Didn’t frequently make obvious poor decisions with the puck, so an acceptable first season as a pro.
Future Outlook: Ellis is still very young, but he’s behind the three other Hamilton rookies in the depth chart at present, so he’ll have his work cut out for him should he ever aspire to make the Canadiens. He’ll be a Bulldog again in the Fall on the second year of his three-year ELC, facing new challenges from the likes of Darren Dietz and possibly Magnus Nygren.

BRENDON NASH – B-

Bulldog Numbers: 26 GP, 1-7-8, +5, 39 PIM
The Skinny: 26 years old, 6’3″, 206 lbs. 2 GP with the Canadiens in 2010-11, narrowly missing the Heritage Classic in Calgary.
His Role: Nash missed all of 2011-12 following knee surgery, and had a hard time readjusting to start the current season. He and Frederic St. Denis were intended to be elder statesmen on the Bulldog blueline.
His Performance: The offense in Nash’s game took a step backward, and he lost a step in terms of footspeed. His game picked up a bit after his trade to the Florida Panthers (and San Antonio Rampage), but not enough to make him look like the legit NHL prospect he was in the last season he played.
Future Outlook: He will be an RFA this summer, and is probably more likely to earn an AHL deal somewhere than to be qualified and retained by the Panthers.

GREG PATERYN – A

AHL Numbers: 39 GP, 7-5-12, -12, 27 PIM
The Skinny: 22 years old, 6’3″, 214 lbs. Deserving winner of the “I was called up before Nathan Beaulieu or Jarred Tinordi award.”
His Role: While a rookie himself, at 22 on a blueline with three 20-year olds, Pateryn assumed a leader role. A steady, stay at home type, who can clear the crease and take the body on occasion, Pateryn’s offensive game – notably an accurate point shot – also came alive midseason, earning him a spot in the top powerplay rotation.
His Performance: When Pateryn was called-up to Montreal, he was Hamilton’s top d-man, playing 27+ minutes a night on a regular basis. He and Nathan Beaulieu started nearly every powerplay and penalty kill, with the star rookie attributing much of his progression to learning from the former Michigan Wolverine.
Future Outlook: Pateryn will have his hands full if he wants to stay ahead of Beaulieu and Jarred Tinordi in Montreal’s depth chart, but it never hurts to have depth, especially on D. He’ll be an important member of the Bulldogs next season, especially should Frederic St. Denis seek an opportunity with an organization less crowded at the position.

FREDERIC ST-DENIS – B

AHL Numbers: 63 GP, 7-11-18, -2, 24 PIM
The Skinny: 27 years old, 5’11”, 190 lbs. 17 GP, 1-2-3 with the Canadiens in 2011-12.
His Role: To be the veteran leader of a very young blueline, logging the tough minutes in a shutdown role on a squad full of rookies. Or it would have been, had he been healthy and played anything like he did a year ago. Had the lockout no wiped out the first half of the NHL season, he may have gotten some games with the Habs in. But it provided enough time for other to catch up to him and take on bigger roles.
His Performance: It was unfortunately a disappointing season for St. Denis. He admitted as much himself at season’s end, saying he had played poorly much of the way. He recovered his game during the final stretch, gradually reclaiming a role as one of the better d-men on the club, but it was too late for him to benefit from another shot with the Canadiens, as by then his job had been overtaken by three first year players. It is somewhat surprising he wasn’t named as one of Montreal’s black aces heading into the post-season, as he seems a natural leader to keep around with the younger scratches, but it’s an indication as to how management viewed his season.
Future Outlook: He’s still a player who could fill in as needed on an NHL blueline short-term, but at 27 it’s unclear if there is another level to his game that could make him a regular in the league. He would be welcome back with the Bulldogs, but as a UFA, he may opt to join a club with a clearer path to a big league job.

JOE STEJSKAL – C

AHL Numbers: 31 GP, 1-5-6, -5, 16 PIM
The Skinny: 24 years old, 6’3″, 206 lbs. Don’t worry. You won’t have to learn how to pronounce his family name.
His Role: Stejskal got into 55 games as a rookie with the Bulldogs in 2011-12, but it was clear he’d have his work cut out for him to keep with the in-coming class. He occasionally paired with Jarred Tinordi on a giant defensive duo, but also spent considerable time with the ECHL’s Wheeling Nailers (where, it should be noted, he was no better than with the ‘Dogs).
His Performance: Stjeskal is capable of throwing his weight around, but he isn’t dependable with or without the puck in his own zone, and has no real offense to his game.
Future Outlook: This was the final year of Stejskal’s entry level contract, and it’s doubtful he’s done enough to earn a stay with the organization. His spot would be better filled by an AHL vetaran who can help drag this team out of the AHL cellar.

JARRED TINORDI – B+

AHL Numbers: 67 GP, 2-11-13, -14, 71 PIM
The Skinny: 21 years old, 6’6″, 218 lbs. Or simply, “Tinormous.”
His Role: Tinordi was a second pair player for most of the season, while logging big minutes in shorthanded situations. His production was on par with his yearly totals with the OHL’s London Knights. A captain in London, he earned an ‘A’ on his sweater in Hamilton midway through the year.
His Performance: Typical of a young player with such a large frame, Tinordi needed time to adjust to the correct positioning and speed of the game at this level. Still, his game improved in leaps and bounds over the course of the season, and following his brief stint with the Canadiens, he seemed to look to up his physical play, which had been missing for the most part this season. As he gets more comfortable with play in the professional ranks as well as his own body, it’ll be more natural for him to throw hits without fear of getting caught out of the action.
Future Outlook: Promising, both from a raw skills perspective, and given that what he brings to the table approximates exactly what the Canadiens are seeking. The most likely scenario would see Tinordi battle Pateryn and Beaulieu for one job in Montreal out of camp in the Fall, with the other two continuing to hone their skills back in Hamilton.

 

GOALTENDERS :

CEDRICK DESJARDINS – B-

Bulldog Numbers: 22 GP, 7-13-2, 2.94 GAA, .905 SV%
The Skinny: 27 years old, 6’0″, 192 lbs. Many fans seem to believe he made his NHL debut for the Montreal Canadiens once upon a time. But they’d be thinking of Yann Danis.
His Role: He was brought in to be a veteran starting goaltender and act as a last line of defense to build the confidence of the team’s young blueliners.
His Performance: In a word, underwhelming. Desjardins has proven in past seasons he can be one of the AHL’s top netminders, but he was anything but this season. Shaky rebound control and soft goals were commonplace, and while the club’s struggles were a team thing, not attributable to only goaltending, Desjardins’s play prior to his trade to Tampa Bay did little to steady the ship.
Future Outlook: This was Desjardins’s second stint with the Canadiens organzation. Would he ever come back a third time, to be traded away once again? Doubtful.

ROBERT MAYER – B

AHL Numbers: 38 GP, 16-17-3, 2.93 GAA, .908 SV%
The Skinny: 23 years old, 6’1″, 197 lbs. Affectionately known to some as “Bobbie Mayday.”
His Role: Coming into the season, little was expected of Mayer, who was clearly penciled in as a #2 behind Desjardins. It seemed as if the organization would be happy to just let him or Peter Delmas fight for the back-up position while they played out their contracts with the squad.
His Performance: In my eyes, one of the bigger surprises on the team. His numbers don’t jump out at you as being sensational, but on many nights, singlehandedly kept Hamilton in games. His rebound control was usually stellar, though the “inconsistent” label that’s followed him throughout his career reared its ugly head at times, which had many questioning the strength of his mental game. On multiple occasions, he would make the stellar ten bell stops, only to let a softie squeak through him moments later.
Future Outlook: Mayer has signed to play in Switzerland next season. It is possible the Canadiens may qualify him to retain his NHL rights before he leaves, as they did with Andreas Engqvist one year ago.

 

 

Categories
IceCaps game report

Bulldogs Breeze by Heat with 5-3 Win [with AUDIO]

By Dan Kramer, Senior Writer, All Habs Hockey Magazine

POST-GAME AUDIO: Brady Vail | Alex Belzile | Joey Tenute

HAMILTON, ON – They say the first game home after a lengthy road trip is one of the toughest to win. But if Wednesday night was an indication, the Hamilton Bulldogs aren’t familiar with that expression.

After posting a 1-3-0 record on the road over the last two and a half weeks, the ‘Dogs returned to Copps Coliseum with a decisive victory, chilling the Abbotsford Heat by a 5-3 final score in a game they controlled for two periods but would ultimately have to survive a third period collapse. 

Bournival's 8th tied Patrick Holland for 2nd in goals among active 'Dogs this season (PHOTO: GETTY / RDS.CA)
Bournival’s 8th tied Patrick Holland for 2nd in goals among active ‘Dogs this season (PHOTO: GETTY / RDS.CA)

Hamilton got off to a good start with the game’s first quality scoring chance as Alex Belzile narrowly missed getting to the rebound of a Joey Tenute shot. Belzile was promoted to the Bulldogs’ top line with Tenute and Patrick Holland for the night – despite it being only the third AHL game of the tryout’s career – based on his production (a goal and two assists) in his two prior outings.

The Bulldogs would make good of their second opportunity however. Michael Bournival took a couple of strides off a Nathan Beaulieu pass and fired a hard wrister off the post and in on netminder Danny Taylor. With Gabriel Dumont in Montreal Bournival led the ‘Dogs in scoring coming into the game with 24 points in 56 contests, and the marker tied him with Patrick Holland for second on the team in goals with 8.

As rare as it has been for Hamilton to score first this season, on this night, they wouldn’t stop there. First Frederic St. Denis would one-time the rebound of a Philippe Lefebvre shot past a helpless Taylor. Brady Vail picked up his first professional point (in his third game) with an assist on the tally. Then just five minutes later, feel-good story Hamilton local Joey Tenute would collect a Belzile pass and fire a rifle top shelf.

The second period saw the Bulldogs add to their lead with a powerplay marker to make it 4-0. Nathan Beaulieu showed great agility in executing a quick spinorama at the point before feeding back to Patrick Holland. Holland would in turn send the puck cross-ice to Greg Pateryn whose slapshot found the back of the net for his 6th in just 27 games. Robert Mayer would close out the period with a number of quality stops as Abbotsford held a 27-16 shot advantage through 40 minutes, though those totals hardly reflected the balance of play.

Nothing has come easy for the boys from Steeltown North this season and this game would not be an exception. The Heat came out buzzing to start the final stanza and markers from Max Reinhart and Roman Horak quickly made it a two-goal affair. Hoping to settle his troops down, coach Sylvain Lefebvre wisely called a timeout.

And it seemed to work. Again the new top line went to work with Holland flashing skill to break in alone on goal, and while he was stepped, Tenute was Johnny on the spot for his second of the night, restoring a three-goal lead. Belzile registered his second helper of the game on the goal – his fifth point in just his third game – and was impressive throughout the night, regularly going hard to the Heat net.

Ben Street would reduce the Heat deficit to two, but that was as close as this one would come, as the Bulldogs pick up a hard-fought and well-deserved win despite what the shot clock might have one think. The win was made all the more impressive by the fact that no fewer than six players were making their Copps Coliseum debuts in the game.

“It’s a little weird for me, just cause I’ve never experienced anything like this,” explained Vail who – given his young age – will return to the OHL’s Windsor Spitfires in the Fall. “I’m here to experience what it’s like at the next level and learn from the pro guys; what it takes, the work ethic, off-ice stuff. All the little things really. Good to get [the first point] out of the way, and hope I get a few more.”

Belzile, playing his first year outside of Quebec and a little self-conscious about his English, is also looking at this as a learning opportunity. “[The AHL] is way faster [than the ECHL]. Just the intensity – you can’t compare them. You have to be smarter – know what you’re going to do with the puck before it comes. Those little details, and I hope [my adjustment] is going to continue the same way.”

 

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IceCaps game report

Tokarski Shines but ‘Dogs Winning Streak Ends at Four [with AUDIO]

By Dan Kramer, Senior Writer, All Habs Hockey Magazine

POST-GAME AUDIO: Dustin Tokarski | Sylvain Lefebvre

HAMILTON, ON – The cellar-dwelling Hamilton Bulldogs entered their Monday afternoon matchup against the Rochester Americans as – surprisingly – one of the AHL’s hottest teams, winners of four straight and five of their last six.  But in this game, the ‘Dogs looked to be at their early season form rather than continuing their recent strong play, unable to generate anything in the way of offense, and coming up on the short end of a 3-0 final, flattering only because of stellar netminding from Dustin Tokarski.

It was another slow start for the Bulldogs, who were outshot 18-7 in the first period and fell behind 1-0 when a Brayden McNabb wrist shot from the point found the corner of the net behind Tokarski. It then became further clear that this wasn’t going to be Hamilton’s night when the second began in the same way, with Luke Adam converting on a two-on-one to double the Americans’ lead.

"If you didn't think Tokarski could stop the puck, now you know," said Sylvain Lefebvre of his message to the team. (PHOTO: Dan Kramer, AllHabs.net)
“If you didn’t think Tokarski could stop the puck, now you know,” said Sylvain Lefebvre of his message to the team. (PHOTO: Dan Kramer, AllHabs.net)

The ‘Dogs seemed to steady the ship a bit around the midway mark of the period, and drew a penalty looking to get on the board. But a terrible powerplay saw the team struggle to even gain entry into the offensive zone, and the ice re-tilted in Rochester’s favour thereafter, with the visitors holding a dominant 37-13 shot advantage through 40 minutes.

“I won’t lie, I haven’t faced that many in a long time. But as a goaltender, you gotta be ready to make 20 saves or 50 saves. Ultimately, they scored more than we did, and their goalie outplayed me. I gotta be better,” said Tokarski post-game, clearly his own harshest critic.

Tokarski notably came up big on one goalmoth stand as the Americans crashed the net, but on four occasions couldn’t slipped one passed the newest member of the Bulldogs.

Despite the lack of effort, down just 2-0, Hamilton seemed to find some stored up energy for the third, increasing their shot total to a respectable 30 on the night, and making David Leggio earn his second shutout of the season (the first also came against the Bulldogs). Sylvain Lefebvre‘s new top six combinations of Mike BlundenJoey Tenute, and Patrick Holland and Gabriel Dumont, Michael Bournival, and Louis Leblanc both had their chances, particularly after Tokarski was pulled for an extra skater with 2:47 to play.

“Nothing was happening before that, so might as well pull him right away and see if we can get one quick, and it’s a 2-1 game,” explained Lefebvre on a night where his squad looked weak at both ends of the ice for two periods.

It’s easy to say that Hamilton had earned an off-night based on their recent strong performances, but still near the basement of the AHL standings, there is no room for error if the team wants to get back into playoff contention. Thus, every game is a must-win as the team moves on to the Bell Centre in Montreal for a rematch with Rochester Friday night.

Categories
IceCaps game report

‘Dogs Show They Still Have Fight with Win Over Stars [with AUDIO]

By Dan Kramer, Senior Writer, All Habs Hockey Magazine

POST-GAME AUDIO:  Sylvain Lefebvre | Jason DeSantis | Greg Pateryn | Robert Mayer

HAMILTON, ON – After displaying neither bark nor bite in a 3-0 loss on Friday, the Hamilton Bulldogs battled back with a much greater effort against the Western Conference-leading Texas Stars Saturday. Led by a 36-save performance by netminder Robert Mayer, Hamilton came out the winning end of a 2-1 decision after Greg Pateryn broke a deadlock with 3:32 to play.

Pateryn's second professional goal was the game-winner. (PHOTO: The Reusch Blog)
Pateryn’s second professional goal was the game-winner. (PHOTO: The Reusch Blog)

The ‘Dogs played a much stronger game than being outshot 37-23 would normally indicate, generating far more scoring opportunities than they did the previous night, including forcing Stars’ goaltender Jack Campbell to turn aside a pair of breakaways by Louis Leblanc and Kyle Hagel. Leblanc was one his side’s more dangerous forwards on the night, displaying a high level of skill on multiple zone entries and narrowly missing teammates with several set-ups before ultimately assisting on Pateryn’s winner by taking the initial shot on the play.

Hamilton battled hard right from opening puck drop, looking competitive with one of the AHL’s top squads in a scoreless first period. The Bulldogs were forced to kill off a 44-second 5-on-3 disadvantage, but as they surprisingly often have this season, they managed to escape unscathed. They say your goaltender needs to be your best penalty killer, and the rule applied in this case, as Mayer made some of his best tops during the two first period minors, aided towards the end by a strong diving clear from Alexander Avtsin, who was dressed for just the 11th time this season.

Despite the strong play from the ‘Dogs, it was Texas that got on the board first. Mayer – who had been making things look easy up to that point – gave up one of what was not more than a handful of real rebound on the night at 4:41 of the second and Luke Gazdic was Johnny on the spot to tuck it under the goaltender’s leg.

While Hamilton didn’t let up after falling behind, it took some fortune for them to draw even. With a delayed penalty call coming to the ‘Dogs and Campbell on the bench, Alex Chiasson attempted a pass back to the point from beside the Bulldog cage. His pass lacked accuracy, however, and ended up going down the full length of the ice and into his own empty goal. Jason DeSantis, who had been desperately trying to break up Texas passing plays as Hamilton had been stuck in its own end on a long shift, got credit for the tying goal.

Both sides had opportunities in the third, with the Bulldogs twice benefiting from man advantage situations, but their powerplay showed just why it now has a league-worst 9.5 per cent efficacy. With the ‘Dogs buzzing late in the period, a blocked Leblanc shot was kicked out into the slot and a pinching Pateryn – playing big minutes in every situation paired with Nathan Beaulieu – made no mistake in one-timing it to the back of the goal. Add in a few frantic final saves from Mayer in the dying seconds, and Hamilton had registered its second win in the past three outings.

The hero on this night, Pateryn, missed considerable time with injury in this his rookie campaign at the professional level, but has played a big role on the squad since returning. “For six weeks I was back on the ice, from Christmas on. I knew conditioning was a big part because I knew there’s a big difference between practicing and being in a game.”

Winning the game was an even bigger feat when you consider the ‘Dogs were forced to play without some of their core contributors. Frederic St. Denis remains out with an undisclosed injury, while all of Jarred TinordiMichael Bournival, and Steve Quailer suffered minor injuries on Friday night and were unavailable Saturday. Tinordi’s likely comes as a result of a fight which saw him take a couple of solid punches, while Bournival limped off the ice after taking a shot off the foot. Late in the game against Texas, Morgan Ellis was nearly added to the injury list on a similar play to that which injured Bournival, and the last thing the team needs is another injury on defense. All players are considered day-to-day at this point.

We’ve asked outselves numerous times throughout the course of the season if a strong Bulldog performance could be the start of something, but the team’s inconsistencies have them sitting 15 big points out the Western Conference’s final playoff spot.  It would take nothing less than a miracle for the team to go on a sufficiently dominant run that would see them continuing to play hockey deep into the Spring, and the players seem aware of that fact.

“The pressure is gone for us. I don’t think we can play with any pressure. We’ve had a tough season. Now it’s just about enjoying the moment, be happy to be out there. Really don’t think. Just play and enjoy the moment,” summed up Mayer, who has been one of the few pleasant surprises on this year’s team. “Guys still have to play their best because there can be injuries in Montreal, and you never know what’s gonna happen. You could be called up, so you have to be at your best every game.”