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IceCaps news

Bourque, Tangradi in Lineup as Bulldogs Take on IceCaps

By Dale Lamontagne, Hamilton Bulldogs Correspondent, Bulldogs Hockey Report 

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HAMILTON, ONT — After losing back-to-back games to the Adirondack Flames last weekend, the Hamilton Bulldogs look to rebound with a two-game set in St. John’s against the IceCaps tonight and Friday.

The Bulldogs  have gone 4-6-2 thus far this season and have struggled to win at home, but are better on the road this year. The ‘Dogs are 3-2-0 on the road and have scored 16 goals, accumulating 6 points. While at home at the FirstOntario Centre, Hamilton has four points and a record of 1-4-2.

The IceCaps have struggled to string along wins this season, as they’re 3-8-4 on the young AHL season, and hold a 2-2-2 record on home ice.

The good news for the Bulldogs tonight, forward Eric Tangradi, who missed 7 games with injury is back in the lineup tonight, while Rene Bourque will make his Bulldogs’ debut tonight after being sent down earlier this week by the Montreal Canadiens.

According to Bulldogs play-by-play guy Matt Holmes, Christian Thomas and Jack Nevins will not play tonight as they’re out with injuries.

We will see goaltender Joey MacDonald in net for the Bulldogs tonight. MacDonald is 3-3-1 so far this season with a 2.70 GAA and a .897 SV%.

You can catch the game on AHLLive, or on the radio at AM 900 CHML.

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IceCaps game report

Bulldogs Fade in the Third, Flames Win 4-3

(Photo by Brandon Taylor / Hamilton Bulldogs Hockey Club)

 

By Dale Lamontagne, Hamilton Bulldogs Correspondent, Bulldogs Hockey Report 

HAMILTON, ONT — For two consecutive games, the Hamilton Bulldogs have blown a lead in the third period to the Adirondack Flames, resulting in back-to-back losses. Yesterday, the Flames defeated the ‘Dogs 3-1, scoring three unanswered goals in the third period, and tonight scoring three goals in the third period, to take down the struggling Hamilton team 4-3.

GAME RUNDOWN 

The first period would see both teams scoring a goal. The Hamilton Bulldogs scored the games first goal, after Gabriel  Dumont stole the puck while the Adirondack Flames were on the power-play, but was denied by Flames goaltender Joni Orito. But luckily enough, Jacob De La Rose picked up the rebound and scored a shorthanded goal and his first ever as a Bulldog.

Moments after the ‘Dogs got on the board, the Flames came back right away scoring a goal on the power-play as Garnet Hathaway was found all alone in front and was able to bury his third goal of the season to tie the game.

With 42 seconds left in the period, Connor Crisp and Bryce Van Brabant dropped the gloves for a heated scrap in front of the Bulldogs bench. Crisp landed multiple punches to the face of Van Brabant, but Van Brabant took him down and he kept swinging and the officials had to intervene.

Bulldogs goaltender Mike Condon made several key saves for Hamilton in the opening frame, notably in the first five minutes of the period.

The Bulldogs were able to take a 2-1 lead in the second period as Sven Andrighetto scored the tally for the ‘Dogs on the power-play. Yes, that’s right. The power-play. It’s been well documented that Hamilton has struggled on the man advantage this season, but they finally potted one and it’s pretty refreshing.

The physicality would continue to pick up in the second period as Jack Nevins dropped  the gloves with Mark Cundari because he wanted to defend his teammate  sticks up for Christian Thomas, who was hit hard at centre ice by Cundari.

Despite Hamilton allowing one goal on the penalty-kill tonight, you have to give credit where its due because they have been pretty decent. The Bulldogs had several chances to score when down a man.

In the third period, we would see a very similar outcome form Friday’s game.

Bryce Van Brabant was able to jam a rebound past Condon to tie the game, but moments later Condon had a tough go with a  rebound and Turner Elson put the Flames ahead.

After Sylvain Lefebvre called a timeout, Condon  made a great first save bet then had a little trouble getting up in his crease after stopping a few shots and Mathieu Tousigant was able to sneak one by to give the Flames a 4-2 lead.

But the Bulldogs tried to make a comeback but they just could not.

They had multiple chances on the power-play but they just could not convert.

Magnus Nygren, who just came back into the lineup after sitting out a few games due to injury, fired a wrist shot from the point past Ortio.

But that wouldn’t be enough for the Bulldogs to tie the game, as the Flames held on to secure a 4-3 victory.

The Flames leave Hamilton with successfully sweeping the weekend series against the Bulldogs. The two teams will meet six more times this season.

Notes: 

  • The Attendance for tonight’s game at FirstOntario Centre: 2,485.
  • Head coach Lefebvre told me post game that Eric Tangradi is considered day-to-day and he hopes to see him back in the lineup on the trip in St. Johns this coming week.

 

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IceCaps game report

Bulldogs Drop Second Game in a Row to Rampage, 5-2

(Mandatory Credit: Brandon Taylor / Hamilton Bulldogs Hockey Club)
(Mandatory Credit: Brandon Taylor / Hamilton Bulldogs Hockey Club)

By Dale Lamontagne,  Hamilton Bulldogs Correspondent, Bulldogs Hockey Report 

HAMILTON, ONT — The Hamilton Bulldogs entered this afternoon’s matinee having lost their last game to the same opponent, the San Antonio Rampage on Saturday, and tonight was no different. The Rampage sunk the Bulldogs by a score 5-2 in front of 2,299 fans. With the loss, the Bulldogs have yet to win a game on home ice this season.

GAME RUNDOWN

The Bulldogs would find themselves down a goal after the first period of play, as Rampage forward Connor Brickley would net his second goal of the 2014-15 AHL season after he came flying down the wing, blasting the puck by Joey MacDonald‘s blocker side.

The power-play struggles continued for the Bulldogs in the first period. They had three opportunities on the man advantage but failed to get anything going as they could not get back in the offensive zone after the Rampage cleared the puck.

The first fight of the game came at the 8:09 minute mark, with Jack Nevins and Shane O’Brien dropping the gloves as Nevins laid a huge check on the veteran AHL defenceman O’Brien.

The Bulldogs started the second period with some good speed and they had multiple chances, but it wouldn’t end the way they wanted as the Rampage extended their lead to 4-1.

But the Bulldogs scored their first goal of the game as Christian Thomas chipped a shot that bounces off a defenseman and over goaltender Dan Ellis.

Shortly after the ‘Dogs got on the board, Jonathan Racine hit Charles Hudon from behind, causing the rookie forward to need some assistance getting off the ice. Hudon stayed on the bench and did not leave to the dressing room, while Racine got a 5-minute major and a game misconduct for the hit.

The Rampage took the lead on 4-on-4, as Rocco Grimaldi scored the goal and then seconds later, McFarland ripped a shot past MacDonald after he flew down the wing.

The Rampage fourth goal of the game was also a nice one, as Wilson came down the wing and chipped a shot over MacDonald’s shoulder for a nice top shelf goal.

Towards the end of the period, Finley, Dowell and Nevins dropped the gloves with a few Rampage players causing a min-line brawl.

For the third period, the Bulldogs would score their second and only goal of the game with a nice point shot from Gabriel Dumont and Rampage goaltender Dan Ellis did not see the shot as he was screened.

The remainder of the period would see back and forth action, but the Rampage scored thier final goal of the game in the empty net. Wilson was credited with the goal and the Rampage would take the game by a score of 5-2.

Game Notes

Head coach Sylvain Lefebvre said froward Eric Tangradi is out with an upper-body injury and is considered day-to-day, while Magnus Nygren is has a lower-body injury and will be re-evaluated tomorrow.

Next Game 

The Hamilton Bulldogs will travel to Buffalo to take on the Rochester Americans at FirstNiagara Centre.  The Bulldogs next home game will be also against Rochester at FirstOntario Centre for the Bulldogs annual school day game.

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IceCaps game report

Thomas Nets First, Bulldogs Drop Second Straight in OT

By Dale Lamontagne, Hamilton Bulldogs Correspondent, Bulldogs Hockey Report

Mike Condon (Photo by Hamilton Bulldogs)
Mike Condon (Photo by Hamilton Bulldogs)

HAMILTON, ONT — The Hamilton Bulldogs (1-0-1) took on the Rockford IceHogs (1-1-0) on Saturday night at FirstOntario Centre, in the team’s second and final game of the opening weekend. The Bulldogs suffered a 3-2, 3-on-3  overtime loss to the Toronto Marlies on Friday and they  were hoping to get back on the winning note  against the IceHogs on Saturday.  Hamilton could not pull off a win as they were defeated 2-1 in 3-on-3 overtime for the second consecutive game to move to a record of 1-0-2.

GAME RUNDOWN 

Hamilton started the first period on a positive note, scoring the game’s first goal on a 2-on-1 rush led by Nick Sorkin and T.J. Hensick with Christian Thomas netting his first goal of the season. The remainder of the period would feature back-and-forth play with the Bulldogs given two power-play opportunities, but they failed to convert.  The IceHogs penalty-killing unit didn’t waste any time dumping the puck out of the zone during the Bulldogs advantage and Hamilton struggled to re-gain the offensive zone.

Like Hamilton in the first period, the IceHogs started the second on a good note and managed to find their way onto the scoreboard with Joakim Nordstrom dragging the puck around Bulldogs netminder Mike Condon and potting the goal.

The first fight of the game came at the 12:58 minute mark of the second period with T.J. Brennan and Drayson Bowman dropping the gloves.  The combatants exchanged a few words after a check behind the net before beginning the bout.

Hamilton’s Sven Andrighetto later went off for tripping and Rockford was awarded their first power-play of the game. Moments after the call, it looked like Rockford scored, but it was waived off for goaltender interference and the game remained tied. After 60 minutes the teams would head to overtime.

For the second consecutive night, the game needed extra time and the 4-on-4 overtime rule did not decide the game, so it was up to the new 3-on-3 rule to kick in for a very short period of time.

Right away, Condon had to make a good glove save during the 3-0n-3, as there was a ton of  ice that created multiple odd man rushes. Moments after the big glove save, Peter Regin picked up a loose puck in Condon’s crease and was able to net the goal to give the IceHogs the victory.

It was a tough loss for the Bulldogs, who managed to pick up two points this weekend, as they dropped both games (Toronto & Rockford) in the new 3-on-3 overtime format. This is something the ‘Dogs will need to work on. Head coach Sylvain Lefebvre said after the game that the team will need to keep practising so that the guys will eventually become more accustomed to the new AHL rule.

BULLDOGS HOCKEY REPORT PLAYER OF THE GAME – ERIC TANGRADI 

Tangardi was named the Dan Lawire Insurance Premium Player of the Game for the Bulldogs tonight. The forward created multiple chances for the ‘Dogs and made a handful of blocked shots.

UPCOMING GAMES 

The Bulldogs are back in action on Friday as they travel to Toronto to take on rival Marlies at Ricoh Coliseum. The team’s next home game will be on Saturday when they host the San Antonio Rampage at FirstOntario Centre.

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Feature

A First Look at Hamilton Bulldogs 2014-15 Lineup

By Dale Lamontagne, Lead Correspondent, Bulldogs Hockey Report

(Photo by Hamilton Bulldogs)
(Photo by Hamilton Bulldogs)

MILTON, ON. — The Hamilton Bulldogs have added some veteran depth up front in signing T.J. Hensick to a one-year deal on Thursday.

It’s no secret the Bulldogs lack veteran help up the middle with just Jacob De La Rose and Gabriel Dumont  currently penciled in on the depth chart. But by adding Hensick, the Bulldogs get a proven forward at the AHL level that will likely center Sven Andrighetto and Christian Thomas on the first line, which could end up being the Bulldogs most offensive line in the 2014-15 campaign.

Hensick, 28, has 371 points in 363 AHL regular season games. He split the 2013-2014 season between the Hartford Wolf Pack and the Swedish Hockey League’s MODO.

In 42 games with Hartford, he scored 34 points (11 goals, 23 assists), and in 31 regular season games with MODO, he scored 15 points (four goals, 11 assists.)

Overall, this is a good depth move for the Bulldogs and I’d expect Hensick to score 30+ points next season, which is something the ‘Dogs desperately need.

There will be several changes in the 2014-15 Bulldogs lineup from last season with 18-goal man Mike Blunden being signed by the Tampa Bay Lightning and goaltender Devan Dubnyk being picked up by the Arizona Coyotes.

Forward Joonas Nattinen is a restricted free agent who received a qualifying offer from the Canadiens but he will be playing for MODO in the Swedish Eite League in the Fall. The Habs chose not to give qualifying offers to the following restricted free agents: forward Robert Czarnik and goaltender Peter Delmas.  Goalie Robert Mayer was released from the final year of his contract instead signing a three year deal with Genève-Servette HC of the Swiss hockey league.

With a hole in their goaltending depth resulting from the departures of Dubnyk, Delmas and Mayer, the Canadiens signed free agent Joey MacDonald to a one-year, two-way deal. MacDonald will likely share the crease with Mike Condon who spent most of his season in the ECHL.

Jacob de la Rose has committed to playing in Canada this season and will likely center the second line.  It will be interesting to see what happens with defenseman Magnus Nygren who has declared that he will not go back to Hamilton after an unsatisfying experience both on and off the ice. Both parties are likely open to a trade.

Mac Bennett could get a chance to play with his Michigan teammate Greg Pateryn. The puck-moving Bennett paired with the stay-at-home Pateryn formed an effective duo for the Wolverines. Also on defense Dalton Thrower was signed to a three-year entry-level contract days after the conclusion of the Canadiens season.

In other changes the Habs finally parted ways with the underachieving Louis Leblanc trading him to the Anaheim Ducks for a conditional fifth round pick. Montreal decided to pass on signing Brady Vail and Erik Nystrom to entry-level contracts. Back in April, the Habs signed forwards Connor Crisp and Daniel Carr from the NCAA champion Union College Dutchmen to contracts. Rugged forward Jeremy Gregoire signed a three-year entry-level contract with the Canadiens but he has one more year of junior hockey left with Baie-Comeau Drakkar.

Below is an updated depth chart of the Bulldogs:

 

0vPGnCLGBulldogsDepthChartFinal2

 

As you can see, the Bulldogs lack veteran depth up front and on the back end whereas the goaltending situation seems fine.

Nonetheless, this signing is the start of many changes that need to be addressed in Hamilton.

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IceCaps game report

Monsters Silence Bulldogs as Captain Takes a Seat [with AUDIO]

By Dan Kramer, Senior Writer, All Habs Hockey Magazine

Post-game audio: Christian Thomas | Sylvain Lefebvre

HAMILTON, ON – With three home games in three days, this weekend was pivotal for the Hamilton Bulldogs to climb back into the AHL Western Conference playoff race.  As the team plays 13 of their final 18 games on the road, it was critical for them to close the gap on the 8th and final spot in front of their own fans. But as much as the team got off to good starts, taking an early lead in all three contests, they failed to collect the four or six points they critically needed. And on Sunday, playing to salvage some positives out of the despair, they failed to even pick up two, dropping a 4-1 decision to the Lake Erie Monsters, who leap-frogged the Bulldogs in the process, dropping Hamilton to last place in the West.

Devan Dubnyk held Hamilton in the game early on, but the goal support failed him. (PHOTO: Hamilton Bulldogs)
Devan Dubnyk held Hamilton in the game early on, but the goal support failed him. (PHOTO: Hamilton Bulldogs)

Pre-game in Hamilton was unusually eventful, as first there was a notable absence from the team’s warm-up. Captain Martin St. Pierre was announced as a healthy scratch; the latest development in what has been a trying season for the veteran, despite his two assists yesterday. Though St. Pierre may lead the Bulldogs in scoring, almost all of his production has come with the man advantage, nearly invisible at even strength, and frequently guilty of poor penalties. Regardless of his play, benching your team’s top scorer and dressing room leader when as a club you struggle to produce is a bold move. So bold, one might argue, that it represented coach Sylvain Lefebvre‘s last straw tactic to try to get his team to play up to their potential, conceivably putting his own job on the line in doing so.

Next, there was almost a second curious storyline as the Bulldogs had only four skaters on ice throughout the national anthems. Nick Tarnasky was missing in action after being announced as part of the starting line-up. The pugilist raced down the hallway from the dressing room and on to the ice just prior to puck drop, ending any conspiracy theories, and then immediately dropped the gloves with Guillaume Desbiens off the opening face-off.

In Devan Dubnyk‘s second start since joining the Bulldogs, it was his teammate Morgan Ellis who made certain the netminder was sharp early on. Two blatant defensive zone giveaways gave the Monsters the game’s first two quality scoring opportunities, but both times the 6’6″ keeper had the last word, swallowing up any rebounds.

After their goalie’s heroics, Sven Andrighetto got the home team’s offense rolling. A solo rush saw him weaver between defenders before firing a wrister on goal, but despite the ensuing scramble, neither he nor Maxime Macenauer could tap a rebound past Calvin Pickard.

Andrighetto would make good later on in the frame, finding Christian Thomas alone at the top of the face-off circle, with the sniper making no mistake in firing a one-timer top shelf to open the scoring. The Swiss winger would nearly got on the scoreboard himself moments after the first tally, taking a delayed feed from Davis Drewiske during 4-on-4 play, but again Pickard resisted.

Strong firsts are nothing new for this year’s Hamilton Bulldogs squad, but the second frame has been their nemesis. A slow start was reversed following a Sylvain Lefebvre timeout, with the ‘Dogs carrying the play for much of the middle stanza without being able to add to their lead. The best chance came as Hamilton was awarded a penalty shot on a call most recently seen at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics. With the puck on Louis Leblanc‘s stick in the attacking zone, a Monster defenseman inadvertently batted a broken stick along the ice at the puck-carrier, and the refs were quick to whistle play down and point to center ice signalling a penalty shot.

Coach Lefebvre went with his most dangerous skater for the shot, but Sven Andrighetto‘s quick backhand to forehand deke was matched with an equally quick Pickard pad.

A common problem for the boys from the Hammer as been failing to capitalize on chances, and thus allowing other teams to hang around for too long. That was the case again in this one, as Nathan McIver would leave his side shorthanded, guilty of an extra two minute penalty prior to a fight with Daniel Maggio. Immediately off the face-off in the ‘Dogs end, David van der Gulik fired a hard wrister up and over a falling Dubnyk to tie the game.

Another common problem has been second period collapses, and in a case of “jamais un sans deux,” van der Gulik was again Johnny on the spot just three minutes later, accepting a dish from Andrew Agozzino completely uncovered the slot and beating Dubnyk with a heavy release.

If the team’s season was on the line in the third period, they disappointingly didn’t play like it. Managing only four shots the entire frame, any hopes of a comeback were wiped out when Matt Hunwick pinched into the high slot on the powerplay, converting on a van der Gulik pass and beating Dubnyk just under the bar blocker side. Michael Schumacher added a fourth tally off a Hamilton turnover, sliding a backhand five hole on the Hamilton netminder in a game that was already out of reach.

Post-game, coach Lefebvre wasn’t entirely happy with his team’s effort, but saw Sunday as a game that could have gone either way. “The powerplay didn’t come up big. Tonight if Andrighetto scores on the penalty shot, it’s 2-0. Our second periods have been nowhere to be found this year. We gain momentum in the first period, then we come out in the second and we’re flat. I don’t know what it is.”

Certainly one of the “what it is” is a lack of scoring, for which the coach also has few answers. “We work on scoring everyday. I wish we could score more goals, but that’s how it is right now and we have to play well defensively. Last night, the empty net goal was the thirteenth this year. We’re in games, but we just can’t find a way to win games when we have to comeback from behind, and scoring is part of it.”

How does a last place team stay motivated with eighteen games remaining in the season and the already slim hope of a playoff berth now requiring nothing short of a miracle? “If we stop believing and we quit, no one is going to benefit from that. It’s our job as coaches and our job as players not to quit, and to battle till the end. Guys are playing for their lives, playing for their livelihoods and their jobs. That’s the plain and simple truth,” summarizes the coach, alluding to the fact that at least on an individual basis, players remain in competition for NHL call-ups.

And then there’s the captain. The team’s lone goal scorer on the night, Christian Thomas, didn’t hide his disappointment in St. Pierre’s absence from the line-up. “It was definitely tough. He’s a presence in the room. He’s a good leader; older guy, brings veteran status out there, but we come to the rink and whatever the lines are, we can’t change it and just have to do our thing out there. He definitely helps, but today I’m not going to blame it cause he wasn’t playing, but we should have showed up more.”

Coach Lefebvre didn’t shy away from tackling the issue of his controversial line-up decision head on. “[St. Pierre] was a healthy scratch tonight. Not happy with his game. Been talking to him a few times, sending him messages here and there not happy with his game. Sometimes as a coach, you have ways to get guys going. Hopefully he’ll rebound and get to playing the way he can play. He’s our captain. He’s the guy that sets the tone, and that’s what we’re looking for.”

Things won’t get any easier from here on out, as after three-in-three at home this weekend, they’ll play three-in-three in different cities on the road next week.

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Feature

Down on the Farm – Snakebitten ‘Dogs Hit the Road

By Dan Kramer, Senior Writer, All Habs Hockey Magazine

HAMILTON, ON – It was a weekend of ups and downs for the Hamilton Bulldogs. Despite solid efforts that had their head coach proud in all three outings, a 6-2 Saturday night offensive outburst on the road was sandwiched between two snakebitten losses at Copps Coliseum. The 1-2-0 weekend  means the ‘Dogs have now lost four of their last six games on the heels of a season-high six-game win streak, dropping them out of a playoff spot for the time being, though they of course remain in the thick of the race.

Hamilton was dealing with the absence of some top players during this stretch, as both Nathan Beaulieu and Louis Leblanc were up in Montreal. Moreover, Sunday’s game required a gutsy effort by the d-men who were in the line-up, as not only was it a third game in less than 72 hours, but the club lost Morgan Ellis – he who I mentioned last week had taken on a far bigger role with the squad – to an apparent shoulder or arm injury midway through the game, forcing them to play out the final period and a half with just five blueliners. It is unknown how long Ellis will be out for, but as a security measure, the ‘Dogs signed ECHL’er Myles Harvey – a 25-year old 6’5”, 225 lbs pro rookie – to a professional tryout agreement.

TRENDING UPWARDS

Thomas joins the Canadiens with goals in his past two AHL games. (PHOTO: BRANDON TAYLOR, via HAMILTON BULLDOGS)
Thomas joins the Canadiens with goals in his past two AHL games. (PHOTO: BRANDON TAYLOR, via HAMILTON BULLDOGS)

– Christian Thomas: Thomas and Sven Andrighetto (who I mentioned last time as trending upwards, and I’m trying to avoid using the same players in consecutive installments) have been Hamilton’s best two forward of late, and coach Sylvain Lefebvre has stuck them together on a line in Louis Leblanc’s absence. In his second year as a pro, the 5’9” 21-year old winger missed the first part of the season with a sports hernia, produced when he returned to the line-up, then seemed to hit a bit of a wall which could have been a conditioning issue due to the time off. Of late however, he frequently leads the team in scoring chances, which helped him collect two goals and an assist over the course of the weekend. While not as feisty as fellow little man Brendan Gallagher, Thomas doesn’t shy away from going to the net. He’s just as comfortable hanging around the high slot, though, as that is where he can unleash his greatest weapon: a rocket launcher arsenal of powerful shots. As a reward for his recent good play and to see how he can handle tougher competition, the Canadiens called Thomas up Thursday evening. The timing is especially nice for the prospect given Montreal plays Tampa Bay on Saturday, and Thomas’s father – former NHL’er Steve Thomas – is a player development consultant with the Lightning.

– Maxime Macenauer: With skilled wingers like Andrighetto and Thomas on the first line, one might expect an equally skilled center like Martin St. Pierre to be the trio’s pivot. But one would be wrong, as that honour has been bestowed upon Macenauer, who has been a coach’s favourite in Hamilton right from the start of the season. You’ll never be “wow’ed” watching him play, but the 25-year old Laval native seems to do all the little things right on the ice. He plays a jack-of-all-trade, master-at-none type of role, capable of killing penalties, winning face-offs, clearing the puck in defensive situations, and dishing to teammates. At 6’0” and 200 lbs, he’s average sized, which about sums up most of his other abilities as well. He works hard and will rarely put you in a trouble situation for sending him out on the ice. For these reasons, Lefebvre may see him as a safety net, which has resulted in significant ice time at even strength, on the powerplay, and on the P.K.

– Jarred Tinordi: If you were to compare Tinordi’s play in Hamilton to how he looked in Montreal during this year’s training camp, it has been a disappointing season for the 21-year old. At 6’6” and 218 lbs, you would hope to see him working on his physical game at the AHL level, but the hits have been few and far between this season, deciding his style was better suited to playing a positional defensive game rather than running around and chasing the opposition. Unfortunately even that has taken some time, as he is far from an impermeable forcefield in his own end, but part of that may simply be confidence. Undoubtedly Tinordi had illusions of grandeur starting the year in the NHL, and the return to the American League was a difficult transition, but since being moved to the top pairing with Greg Pateryn, his game has taken a step forward. Playing with a partner that he doesn’t have to worry about covering for, he seems more confident in his own skates. Though still not throwing big hits, the American behemoth is an adequate crease-clearer, and unlike a Doug Murray or Hal Gill, is a very smooth skater, able to pick his spots and support offensive breakouts despite what his low point total would make one think. If not overly physical during game action, Tinordi never shies away from after the whistle scrums, always there to stand up for a teammate and dropping the gloves with semi-regularity.

 

IN A RUT

There's nothing wrong with a powerplay specialist that leads your team in scoring, but the Bulldogs had greater hopes when signing St. Pierre. (PHOTO: BRANDON TAYLOR, via HAMILTON BULLDOGS)
There’s nothing wrong with a powerplay specialist that leads your team in scoring, but the Bulldogs had greater hopes when signing St. Pierre. (PHOTO: BRANDON TAYLOR, via HAMILTON BULLDOGS)

– Martin St. Pierre: It is imperative that Sylvain Lefebve separates St. Pierre from linemate Patrick Holland to get at least one of the two should-be-AHL-stars going. They have been paired at five-on-five for some time now, and the line has become a virtual black hole for the Bulldogs, generating little in the way of offensive opportunities despite the skill sets of its members. Though he may lead the team in scoring, captain St. Pierre has been a disappointment this season, unable to play an offensive catalyst role at even strength, and frequently guilty of poor or lazy penalties. In the face-off dot, the team relies heavily on Macenauer and Joonas Nattinen, effectively limiting St. Pierre to a role of powerplay specialist. While that definitely has its uses, it’s not the high impact signing the Bulldogs believed they had bagged when inking the veteran last summer. Plus-minus may not be a high quality statistic, but his -7 being second worst on the team to only Nick Tarnasky is very reflective of his play this year.

– Mike Blunden: It’s hard to dislike Mike Blunden. The former second round selection of the Chicago Blackhawks is a model teammate and works hard every shift. He can play a physical game with his 6’3” frame, and positions himself well in the slot to obtain scoring chances nightly. Unfortunately his weak skating and mediocre hands have betrayed him this season, as the ‘Dogs needed him to take on a more offensive role on a team with little experienced firepower. Though he remains the team’s fourth leading scorer, he has been ice cold in 2014, with only 1 assist and a -2 rating in his past nine games. When the team is winning, it’s easy to laugh at the number of great Gabriel Dumont set-ups that Blunden fans on or fires wide. But when the goals are tougher to come by, what should be a dependable and productive line has been letting the team down at times.

– Greg Pateryn: This isn’t to say that Pateryn has been bad, but just as I spoke so very highly of him earlier this season, it’s fair to point out that the Pateryn of the past five or so games hasn’t been playing up to that level. Part of it may be learning to play with Jarred Tinordi after spending significant time beside Nathan Beaulieu, but Pateryn has only a single point to go with a -1 rating in his past nine games while looking more human in his own end following a dominant start. The injury to Ellis and the absence of Beaulieu will put a lot of pressure on Pateryn and Tinordi as the Bulldogs head out for an extended road trip, so the team needs the 23-year old to be at his best, rather than committing the kind of turnovers we’ve seen most recently.

The Bulldogs head out west this weekend for two games against the Abbotsford Heat, and remain on the road for stops in Rockford, Milwaukee, Binghamton, and Toronto. They’ll return home to the newly renamed FirstOntario Place (formerly Copps Coliseum) for a date with the Texas Stars on February 15. As the team finds itself in a playoff battle in the second half of the regular season, home crowds been gaining steam in Hamilton creating a great atmosphere, so be sure to check the team out if you’re in the area, with tickets available at http://www.hamiltonbulldogs.com/.

 

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IceCaps game report

‘Monster’ Second Period Spoils Thomas’s Bulldog Debut [with AUDIO]

By Dan Kramer, Senior Writer, All Habs Hockey Magazine

POST-GAME AUDIO: Joonas Nattinen

HAMILTON, ON – Losers of five straight, the Hamilton Bulldogs needed to turn a page Friday night if they wanted to avoid squandering a good start to the 2013-14 season, finding themselves a game below .500 entering action at Copps Coliseum. Whatever coach Sylvain Lefebvre said to the team during a lengthy meeting the day prior looked like it was going to prove effective early on, with the Bulldogs building an early lead, but the same old mental lapses crept back into their game come the middle stanza, ultimately costing the club a chance to take the first half of a key divisional home-and-home. A third period insurance marker by former Hab J.T. Wyman sealed the deal, solidifying a 5-3 victory for the visiting Lake Erie Monsters.

There was good news for the Bulldogs before the game got underway, as it was announced that Christian Thomas had been cleared medically from the sports hernia he suffered during Montreal Canadiens’ training camp, and could thus officially join the team, set to make his season debut. He began on a line with Martin St. Pierre and Nick Tarnasky, while also playing the point on Hamilton’s top powerplay unit beside Nathan Beaulieu.

But it would be another line that would allow the Bulldogs to open the scoring midway through the first period. A great individual effort saw Gabriel Dumont work a puck out front, eventually finding Justin Courtnall for an easy tap-in.  The period ended with the Monsters getting into penalty trouble, resulting in them starting the second two men short.

A highlight-worthy Nattinen goal looked like it would signal a good night in Hamilton, until another 2nd period collapse burried the 'Dogs. (PHOTO: BERNARD BRAULT, LA PRESSE)
A highlight-worthy Nattinen goal looked like it would signal a good night in Hamilton, until another 2nd period collapse buried the ‘Dogs. (PHOTO: BERNARD BRAULT, LA PRESSE)

When a team fails to cash in on a 5-on-3 powerplay, it can sometimes be a turning point for their opposition. It looked for a moment like this would be the case, as Lake Erie generated a solid chance off the rush in the moments after the second penalty had expired, but Robert Mayer staved off the attack. The Bulldogs ensured they would maintain momentum by turning the puck back up ice, as a great burst of speed from Stefan Fournier created a two-on-one opportunity, with Joonas Nattinen diving to reach a pass and deflect it by a sliding Sami Aittokallio for a 2-0 lead.

It never comes easy for a team looking to snap a skid, however. Less than three minutes after Nattinen’s goal, the Monsters won an offensive zone face-off back to Gabriel Beaupre, whose point shot beat Mayer cleanly – one he’d undoubtedly like to have back. Lake Erie immediately resumed buzzing off the ensuing draw, and Guillaume Desbiens completed a passing play at the lip of the crease just thirty five seconds later, evening the score and forcing Lefebvre to call a timeout in the efforts of settling his troops down.

Any effect of the timeout was shortlived, as two minutes after the tying goal, the Monsters forced Mayer into a highlight-reel one-timer save. The netminder was unable to avoid kicking out a rebound on to a Lake Erie stick, and Lady Luck smiled on the visitors when a centering pass deflected into the Bulldogs net off Magnus Nygren‘s skate without a maroon sweater in sight.

When it rains, it pours, and for the second time in a week, a full second period storm struck Hamilton. While it didn’t come close to matching the dubious team record set the previous Friday against Grand Rapids – allowing four goals in 1:13 – the team would surrender its fourth consecutive marker, as Mitchell Heard collected his third point of the game with a lucky deflection of a point shot that bounced way up high over Mayer and into the cage. The line of Tarnasky, St. Pierre, and Thomas – a source of excitement pre-game – fell to -3 on the night on the insurance marker. The goal signaled the end of the night for Mayer, replaced by Dustin Tokarski for the second time in as many starts.

Facing a sixth straight defeat, undoubtedly Lefebvre has started to feel some pressure for his own job security, and his second intermission speech awoke the slumbering ‘Dogs. Led by the bottom six lines of Gabriel DumontMike Blunden, and Justin Courtnall, and Joonas NattinenSteve Quailer, and Stefan Fournier, Hamilton fired whatever they could at Aittokallio, looking to get back into the game, and it was Blunden who would corral a puck in the slot and fire a shot just inside the post to draw back within one. The Finnish netminder would stymie any further attempts, however, until Wyman benefited from an off-balance Tokarski to bank a wraparound in off his pad, giving the Monsters all the production they needed for a win in Steeltown.

Where do you go from here? The optimist would say the only place is “up,” but other than eventual returns of the injured Patrick Holland and Darren Dietz, no further roster upgrades are in sight, given the Canadiens’ improving health. Sometimes it only takes a single win to reverse the trends and find some positives to build on, and Hamilton will get that chance right away on Saturday, as they visit the Monters before returning home for a rare Tuesday night game against the Texas Stars.

 

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Feature

Retooled Bulldogs Ready to Rebound

By Dan Kramer, Senior Writer, All Habs Hockey Magazine

HAMILTON, ON – One year ago, I wrote an article referring to the American Hockey League’s Hamilton Bulldogs as potential 2013 Calder Cup contenders. Flash forward to today, and that looks like a foolish prediction given the team’s 30th place overall finish this past season.

It’s easy to see what went wrong. A rookie head coach struggled to get his feet under him early on, and before he knew it, the rug had been swept from beneath him with injuries to both Blake Geoffrion and Aaron Palushaj – the two veteran forwards who were supposed to lead his young team in scoring. The offensive forward who had looked so dominant between the two wingers the season before – Louis Leblanc – was mired in a deep sophomore slump. The other veterans brought in to help a squad full of rookies – Darryl Boyce and Zack Stortini – played so poorly that it was tough to believe they had ever laced up skates in the National Hockey League.

On defense, it wasn’t a banner season for either of the team’s experienced vets. Frederic St. Denis got off to a very slow start, and then battled injuries. Brendon Nash‘s play had him slipping down the team’s depth chart to the point where he was moved for more of a specialist in Jason DeSantis in a failed effort to spark the team’s powerplay, a situation that only became tougher when DeSantis was forced to take personal leave to attend to an ailing parent.

And who could have foreseen goaltending troubles? Cedric Desjardins was as established an AHL netminder as one could have hoped for, but was quickly outplayed by Robert Mayer, a ‘tender that almost no one thought was in the plans beyond the current campaign a year ago.

Beaulieu emerged as one of the AHL’s most dynamic d-men by season’s end (PHOTO: Jennifer Kuhn)

The rest of the squad was composed primarily of rookies, most of whom had successful introductions to professional hockey. When the lockout ended, losing Brendan Gallagher certainly didn’t help Hamilton’s chances of a second half rebound, but his play in Montreal was a testament to how well he had made the transition from the junior ranks. As were the brief call-ups of Jarred TinordiGreg Pateryn, and Nathan Beaulieu, the latter of which was one of the AHL’s top blueliners over the season’s final months.

With so many things going wrong last season, it would be easy to lose hope as a ‘Dogs supporter. But such despair would be misplaced, as the team has quickly gone about readying itself to right the ship, and the 2013-14 edition will be looking to bite back. General Manager Marc Bergevin hasn’t hesitated to bolster the group that finished last season with a number of interesting UFA signings, leaving the current depth chart as follows:

Patrick Holland – Martin St. Pierre – Christian Thomas
Mike Blunden – Michael Bournival – Louis Leblanc
Sven Andrighetto – Joonas Nattinen – Nick Tarnasky
Stefan Fournier – Ben Duffy – Steve Quailer
Stephen MacAulay

Nathan Beaulieu – Greg Pateryn
Darren Dietz – Morgan Ellis
Magnus Nygren – Drew Schiestel

Robert Mayer
Mike Condon

The core roster has familiar faces at every position. However, all of Patrick HollandMichael BournivalSteve QuailerNathan BeaulieuGreg Pateryn, and Morgan Ellis were professional rookies a year ago. By season’s end, Holland was among the most dangerous ‘Dogs offensively, Bournival a responsible two-way player in the mold of Tomas Plekanec, and Pateryn and Beaulieu formed a legitimate AHL top pairing. Certainly, a big part of the team’s success will depend on the continued development of these returnees.

But the depth chart is also sprinkled with new faces throughout. At forward, the big fish was the signing of Martin St. Pierre, a seemingly perennial AHL all-star who, at 29, has appeared in 38 career NHL games split among three different teams. While undersized, St. Pierre – coming off a year of 26 goals and 59 points in 76 games – is a significant upgrade on Joey Tenute who finished 2013 as the team’s #1 centre and has signed with Malmo in Sweden for 2013-14.

The other new veteran is Nick Tarnasky, a pugilist who will contribute far more than either Zack Stortini or Kyle Hagel managed to last season. Twenty-eight year old, 6’2″ Tarnasky won’t hesitate to drop the gloves to defend a teammate, seen in his 138 AHL penalty minutes last season, but also has greater skill with the puck than a Stortini or Hagel, having scored 16 times in 74 contests for Rochester last year.

Thomas played one NHL game in his rookie pro season, coincidentally against the Canadiens (PHOTO: Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
Thomas played one NHL game in his rookie pro season, coincidentally against the Canadiens (PHOTO: Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

Perhaps the most surprising acquisition was that of Christian Thomas, who Bergevin ceded Danny Kristo to the New York Rangers in order to acquire. Kristo joined Hamilton late last season to great fanfare once North Dakota’s year came to an abrupt end. While making the jump from college hockey to the American League can be a difficult one, Kristo did little to impress Bulldog faithful in his short time in Steeltown. That, combined with off-ice behavioural questions, may have motivated Bergevin to deal, and in Thomas, Hamilton adds another professional sophomore, who isn’t the biggest at 5’9″, but plays a tough game not unlike Brendan Gallagher. While he may not quite match Gallagher’s ferocity around the net, he compensates with an extra offensive weapon of a quick and heavy arsenal of shots, used to net 19 goals in his first AHL season. Thomas should be an important part of this year’s Hamilton offense.

Four players should be making their AHL debuts at forward for the ‘Dogs. The first is Sven Andrighetto, a 2013 3rd round pick as an overage player who had begun to tear up the QMJHL after completing his adjustment from junior Swiss leagues to North American style hockey. Another player without the biggest of frames, Andrighetto is highly skilled and has the potential to fill a top six role on the squad once he adjusts to bigger, tougher, and faster competition.

The other three are undrafted players that earned NHL or AHL contracts coming out of Montreal’s July Development Camp in Brossard. Ben Duffy is last season’s QMJHL scoring champion, and earned a contract following a two-goal performance in the scrimmage on camp’s final day, centering a dominant line with Erik Nystrom and Sebastian Collberg. He brings depth to the squad, even if he’ll be battling to avoid starting in the ECHL in training camp, looking to be a more significant contributor than a Stefan Chaput on last year’s team. Stefan Fournier is a big body who can play a physical game but also put up points, scoring 16 goals in 17 games in the QMJHL playoffs before helping the Halifax Mooseheads capture the Memorial Cup. Finally, Stephen MacAulay was a teammate of Fournier’s in Halifax, both in their overage CHL seasons as 20 year olds. MacAulay is more of a two-way forward who – just like Fournier – has been recognized for off-ice leadership and work ethic.

With the Canadiens renewing their ECHL affiliation with the Wheeling Nailers, there remains room to add a forward or two for extra depth should the right fits arise. There is also the possibility that the team’s top forward last season, Gabriel Dumont, is returned to the AHL, though he’d need to clear waivers to do so, and thus there is a chance that either the Canadiens decide to retain him, or that he is claimed by another organization. Another name to keep in mind is Alex Belzile, a player who impressed on a late-season call-up tryout from Wheeling, and who was then invited to Development Camp in July, but has yet to sign for the coming year.

On defense, it is clear Bergevin must continue his shopping for reinforcements. The current top five members of the depth chart are either first or second year AHL’ers, and thus a veteran presence is needed to stabilize the group and share the tougher minutes. Some available names include former Hab Jay LeachGarnet ExelbyJim Vandermeer, and Jeff Woywitka.

There are two bright new faces on D with reasonable NHL upside. Darren Dietz capped a solid junior career with a season in which he led all CHL blueliners in goals (24) and participated in the Memorial Cup with the host Saskatoon Blades. A 5th round pick in 2011, he backs up his offense with a sound physical package and will quickly battle a player like Morgan Ellis in the injury call-up hierarchy.

Every bit as intriguing is Magnus Nygren, who brings a similar value proposition to the table with toughness and a booming point shot, but who has the benefit of a couple of years experience playing against men in the Swedish Elite League after having been drafted as an overager in 2011. The 23-year old will make his North American debut after 13 goals in 51 games for Farjestad earned him the title of the SEL’s top Swedish blueliner last season.

The most recent addition, Drew Schiestel, fills a depth AHL/ECHL ‘tweener role left vacant by the unqualified Joe Stejskal. The once Buffalo 2nd round selection was taken far earlier than anyone had projected in the entry draft and at 24 has yet to make his NHL debut.

Missing from the above depth chart is Jarred Tinordi, who will battle with Greg Pateryn for the right to start the season in Montreal at least as long as it takes Alexei Emelin to recover from knee surgery (likely at least till late November). Also absent is Dalton Thrower, who as a late birthday would be eligible to play in the AHL this coming season (like Beaulieu last year). Thrower is coming off a difficult season for Saskatoon, and is thus more likely to return for a final year in the WHL with the Vancouver Giants, who acquired his rights from the Blades after the Memorial Cup.

Tokarski performed admirably for the Bulldogs, yet doesn't seem to have earned the organization's trust.
Tokarski performed admirably for the Bulldogs, yet doesn’t seem to have earned the organization’s trust.

A glaring weakness in the above depth chart is in goal. Robert Mayer performed well above expectations last season, wrestling the “#1a” tag from Cedric Desjardins, and then competing with Dustin Tokarski for ice-time. Still, he is nothing more than an “average” goaltender even at the AHL level, and would be relegated to back-up duties in an ideal situation.

Tokarski’s case is an interesting one, as the 23-year old still has potential as a future NHL goaltender, but may not see the Canadiens organization as a good fit for his development. Tokarski put up sensational numbers after being acquired by the Bulldogs, with 3 shutouts in 15 games, and a sparkling .927 save percentage and 2.22 GAA. But still coach Sylvain Lefebvre balanced his workload with Mayer’s, unwilling to give the former Tampa Bay Lightning prospect the lion’s share of duty. Adding to this, when the Canadiens needed a goaltender to sit on the bench in the Stanley Cup playoffs following an injury to Carey Price, it was Mayer who got the call to back-up Peter Budaj, rather than Tokarski. The re-signings of both Budaj and Mayer to two-year deals, plus the drafting of Zachary Fucale in the second round this past June further complicate things for Tokarski, who remains a restricted free agent after the Habs qualified him last month.

Enter Mike Condon, a Princeton University standout who was signed to a two-year entry-level deal to further cloud the goaltending pipeline. After completing his college career, Condon appeared in just four ECHL and five AHL regular season games last year, but his .943 and .919 save percentages respectively are enough for one to think that there is some promise to his future. If Tokarski returns – an increasingly bigger IF with each passing day – Condon is likely to start in Wheeling, splitting duties with Peter Delmas, but without Tokarski in the picture, the Bulldogs would be gambling on two highly unproven netminders.

Off the ice, the changes were even more plentiful for the Bulldogs, starting with the introduction of a new Assistant Coach in former Hab Stephan Lebeau. The Bulldogs had just a single Assistant Coach last season following the early dismissal of Ron Wilson (citing philosophical differences with rookie head coach Sylvain Lefebvre), instead opting to rotate player development coaches Patrice Brisebois and Martin Lapointe at times behind the bench. Lebeau is a bit of a peculiar hire considering he is coming out of Bishop’s College – where he coached for the past five seasons – after just two years as a QMJHL head coach. He has no experience at the professional level, on a staff where already Lefebvre has just completed his first season as a head coach at any level (after just two years as an AHL assitant and three years as an NHL assistant) and assistant Donald Dufresne‘s most recent campaign was his first in professional hockey after 10 years as an assistant with Rimouski. The direction seems clear: this is Lefebvre’s team, and improvement will have to come as he grows into the role, managing his staff his way, for better or for worse.

Adding to this were changes to the rest of the off-ice staff, as the Bulldogs attempted to change the team’s culture in letting go virtually the entire equipment management, training, and medical staff. Replacing them are much of the former staff of the Rimouski Oceanic, including Eric Levesque and Francis St. Pierre, both having helped out during Montreal’s development camp, though no formal announcement has been made.

These hires are important in surrounding the impressive group of young men who will be passing through Hamilton over the next few seasons. In addition to the above roster and mentioned players, the Bulldogs may benefit from some added scoring come April. Recent draftees Charles HudonBrady Vail, and Tim Bozon will be eligible to join the team once their junior seasons are over, and will be full time members in 2014-15. The first two got a taste of AHL action at the end of last season, and contributed even at such a young age, while Bozon represented France at the World Championship, facing off against much older men. Another player who would likely come in to support a playoff run is Sebastian Collberg, who played in two end-of-season games for Hamilton last year, but will return to Sweden for one final season after having signed his entry level deal with the Canadiens.  

All of this should make for some exciting hockey this season in Hamilton as the team turns the page on a tough and disappointing 2012-13 campaign. For any Hab fans in the GTA region, the opportunity to watch and follow their team’s stars of tomorrow is not to be missed.

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The Hamilton Bulldogs 2013-14 schedule has not yet been released, but the team is currently offering a phenomenal deal to attend 4 games – including the always popular home opener and Toy Toss nights – for under $15 a ticket. For more info, see here.